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Dimitris1980's picture
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Joined: 2009 Apr 21
Your preference on Mac computers (Desktop, Tower, All In One)?

What is your preference regarding the Macintosh computer cases?

Personally i prefer the towers, i find them more impressive, the bigger the more impressive. I like also the computers that have places for lots of expansions and big upgrades. Although i do not own, i love the Macintosh Quadra 950 and the Powermac 9600. Powermac 9600 is really impressive and it has amazing expandability.

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Gary's picture
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Joined: 2011 Jul 21

I have a bunch of models of all kinds. But for the past 3 years I've used a Macbook Pro 17" laptop just about exclusively.

Gary

Knez's picture
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Joined: 2010 Feb 11

My all time favourite Mac is the SE/30 and I think that sums up what I like. I like All in one type of computers and preferable the ones with a tiny footprint as well Smile

Dimitris1980's picture
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Even it is not a tower, i love my Macintosh Performa 6116. It is a pizza box, not too much space for installations but it is a computer that you can do a great upgrade. With the sonnet g3 500 mhz installed it really flies and it is very responsive. For years was my favourite Mac from the machines that i own.

I like also like my Macintosh LC475 because is small and light. The Mac Mini of this period? Motorola games like sierra on line adventure games run better than powerpc computers.

Power Macintosh G3 Beige Minitower. A friend of mine gave it to me 10 years before. He told me that probably does not work. I tested it on summer, it has some issues, maybe the power supply, i do not know, i am expecting a used one to replace it. It is really great. It has 333 mhz and 6mb video ram but i connected a Mac Edition Ati Radeon 7000 32mb ram and it is really fast. This could be my favourite computer. It is a tower and i prefer it than power macintosh blue & white because you can install mac os 8 which is very stable and great for older games, i ran with success sierra on line adventure games with the roland mt32 and you can do a nice upgrade for newer and 3d games. Although powermac blue & white is more modern and beautiful i prefer running older games like Fate of Atlantis on beige computers.

MikeTomTom's picture
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Joined: 2009 Dec 7

I have a great fondness for form factor "LC" (pizza box) and the form factor "IIcx". The Quadra 700 (I think) was the final Mac to use the IIcx form for a case.

I liked the IIcx form because it was so easy to get into and work on (upgrades and fixes, etc).

WhosIt.There's picture
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Joined: 2014 Aug 23

Anything that is easy to open up to upgrade / repair ... that basically leaves out almost every Intel Mac. Sad The 'pizza box' was great, the PowerMac G3 mini-tower was great (although the wiring for the drives could be fiddly). In terms of it's size, the Mac Mini is very useful since it can go almost anywhere, including stuck in a cupboard as a server, and is portable (as long as there is a display where you're going).

fogWraith's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 23

The pizza box form factor tops my list, the amount of power that fits inside such tiny space is simply amazing, not to mention they're incredibly easy to work with (and look so good!).

As far as "towers" go, Quadra 700 is the dream machine.

Laptops? Never really liked them much, even though it's the ones I have the most of. I like being stationary, in a chair, by a desk.. so something not a laptop works best Tongue

WhosIt.There's picture
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The Mac Mini beats the pizza box for "power that fits in such a tiny space" (and probably 'bang for buck' price as well) ... but it's let down by the sheer silliness of not being easy (although easier than the iMac!) to get into and being unable to upgrade almost anything inside it. Sad

fogWraith's picture
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I tried liking the Mini (PPC/Intel) for what it was, but the GPU was always the thing that held it back for me so it never got to serve much other purpose than being a headless server, set and forgotten in a dark corner :/

WhosIt.There's picture
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They can also make good set-top TV media players, especially the older ones which can be used with the Apple Remote (the new ones no longer have the infrared receiver, but you could control them from an iOS device instead).

fogWraith's picture
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Yeah that worked really good for a while, I even put some effort into encoding movies / TV-shows so that they would play without stuttering, but a larger and more modern TV left me wanting higher quality :/

If I had the space, I'd probably get myself a CRT and a G4 Mini for that purpose again

Bolkonskij's picture
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Joined: 2009 Aug 3

One of the reasons I love my 6100 is the "pizza box" housing. A middle thing between really compact Macs and big towers. It's easy to open and replacing e.g. a pram battery too. The compact Macs like the SE/30 or iMac G3 are really cool too, but then it's such a hassle to replace stuff once it gets broken. Also like the towers, like my G4 MDD. But then I think it is maybe more the power they have that I like rather then the housing...

MikeTomTom's picture
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Joined: 2009 Dec 7

One of the reasons I love my 6100 is the "pizza box" housing.

I have a younger sibling to this, in the same form factor case - a Centris 660AV. Got to say, it's one of my favorite Mac's too. I might give it a new PRAM battery for it's 26th birthday this year in July Wink

SkyCapt's picture
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Joined: 2017 Jan 11

Tower like PowerMac G4, not bulky tower like PowerMac G5. I bought the PMG4 Mirror Door 2003, remains my main-thing to this day, and since it is (the oldest that is) modernly competitive it's gonna stay my main thing until it can no longer add any two numbers together. "Mini-tower" is the way to go, but because lately the most sensible ideas are the least followed through on, and impractical crap reigns supreme, Apple hasn't made ANY sensibly sized/priced tower since the Mirror Door, EVER since.

Towers are deliberately spread out inside so that fan cooling is straightforward and easily adjusted, so, what a fraud it has been that the Mirror Door models were branded the reputation of a false narrative of being "hot beasts", ultimately blamed on the CPU chip (slash power supply) rather than Apple's asinine air-cooling circus within these models. Easily corrected by us smartees, because it is a Tower. Rather, they pushed the false narrative that the G4 design had met its end, and not long after, upheld the same narrative that the G5 and in turn all of PowerPC had also met its end. In reality, G4 and G5 chips could have endlessly been "die shrunk" toward smaller and ever smaller transistors which would have yielded cooler and more power efficient chips, as well as, faster, and bigger cache. Instead, the bad guys, Intel, won.

I acquired a yr 2008 "iMac" and would you believe it, I "liberated" (gutted) its circuit boards with heatsinks and built my own mini tower using them mounted inside a generic steel box. I gave it ONE exhaust fan motor in the top corner near main heatsink and a slit across the bottom for air to enter. Anyone would have to be crazy to entrust in Apple to have designed the iMac case so that it's not slowly cooking the life outta those boards due to insufficient cooling. I did the right thing, made the right moves.

Issues I had with my iMac project were... the optical laser disc drive had to be present in order to boot it, I had no intention of actually using the slow/scratchy slim slotload drive, and I discovered I could strip down the drive unit to just its circuit board and connecting cable, then boot. Real optical drive gets attached to external FireWire. Next, the pair of little heatsinks along one edge of the PSU card are actually live energized with high voltage, ouch, careful when working inside while powered up.

My custom mini tower case for my iMac has enabled me to worryfree overclock ITS ram just like I have done to my Mirror Door's ram. Most people don't "get it" and they are low level consumer/slaves, not In Control of their electronic crap which is being mass produced by the Big Brother Military Industrial Complex. This stupid phone I'm typing on could not just now "suggest" the word "Complex" to follow when had typed "Military Industrial", it made me peck every single letter. Oh, the ignorance.

YYsMG's picture
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Joined: 2009 Aug 19

All the form factors have their charms but my choice will usually be a laptop. Size and portability is a major convenience for me, but i think the AIO is the quintessential Macintosh form factor. All of the most the iconic Macs have been AIOs, even if the towers/pizzaboxes/pretty much everything else are more usable and more fun to tinker with.

MacTouch's picture
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Well, I never liked AIO myself, too closed... I mean not very evolutive. That's only my opinion. I've owned some "pizza box" Macs first. The first one was a LC 475 & liked it. The Centris 660AV & 61xx lines were also some of my prefered ones, even I never owned those. I like also most Towers. I owned a 9600 but not really used it. I remember testing Duke Nukem optimized & not. What a difference of performance I was thinking. And some months later, I bought a G3 Beige with an internal DVD player. This was my main computer for several years. But yes, the 9600 has 6 PCI slots, the double of the G3 Beige. But I think G4 towers offer the same evolution than the 9600 with a lot of powerful improvements. The particular one I prefer is the QS line. Smile All the Macs I owned are listed in my guestbook...

MikeTomTom's picture
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Joined: 2009 Dec 7

Well, I never liked AIO myself, too closed... I mean not very evolutive.

What? You mean you never used a MacCharlie? Wink - Just kidding, I've never used one either.
Some of these ad pages for the 1985 MacCharlie, are interesting tho' Smile

My opinion on AIO is much the same as yours. I like them, but taking them apart makes me sweat - poking around the back of exposed CRT's does this to me. My 1st was an SE, since then I've had at least one SE/30, Classic, Classic II, LC 575, and iMac G3's of various flavors.

Lastly I was given a G4 eMac 1GHz. This eMac I tried to find a home for, but couldn't give it away. No one wanted such a monster at a time when no-one used CRT computers anymore. Maybe I should have done like the SkyCapt, disassembled it and placed the guts into an easier-to-work-on box. But I find the eMac even more daunting than a G3 iMac to take apart. So I decided to keep it, with some small modifications. I've disabled the internal CRT and use an external flat-screen monitor with it. The eMac now sits on the floor under a desk like a Mac tower. Actually it runs very quietly and is well behaved like this. It runs Mac OS 9.2.2 exclusively, with no OS X on board (even tho' it originally shipped with Jaguar + Classic).

I also like the G4 towers, with a preference for the QS line.

MacTouch's picture
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Joined: 2016 Mar 19

May be one SE/30 when I discover Apple on working, (and no, thank godness, not the MacCharlie Tongue). I've never taking apart such machines myself. However, I"ve done it with many iMac LCD, although I don't really like them too... Other machines I like are the Mac II line. I started working on a IIfx for example. Also, the IIvx/vi or 7100 form factor... And a lot of laptops. Smile

WhosIt.There's picture
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What? You mean you never used a MacCharlie? Wink - Just kidding, I've never used one either.
Some of these ad pages for the 1985 MacCharlie, are interesting tho' Smile

Hmmm ... never even heard of that add-on, but in the UK, the name 'Charlie' used to have the meaning of being a fool (MacmillianDictionary.com) ... well fitting for Prince Charles, but the term predates him by about 100 years.

MikeTomTom's picture
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Joined: 2009 Dec 7

There was also a "charlie horse" which cruel kids in the playground would inflict upon their contemporaries.

But it doesn't refer to that, either.

The "Charlie" in MacChalie refers to the original IBM PC ads where IBM used Charlie Chaplin's "Little Tramp" character to sell their all new "Personal Computer" to the masses, back in the late 1970's - early 80's.

MacCharlie's logo featured an apple morphing into a bowler hat.

SkyCapt's picture
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In America,
https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlie_the_Tuna
"Sorry, Charlie".

Chaplin IBM PC, who was the IBM "PC Jr." mascot?

SkyCapt's picture
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Joined: 2017 Jan 11

Here's my mini tower case made of steel:

Get the dimensions you want, already painted a variety of colors, with a handle/grip on "top", for very little money.

Research "tool chests", find one that has a "drawer" your size, cross reference the chest model number so you can order the drawer as a repair part. You get 5 of the 6 sides prefabbed, handle on top, and there's already holes preexisting (for drawer track mount) on both sides where you need to attach L brackets to hold the sixth side you make out of sheet metal.

My air intake slit is formed by cutting the sixth side's sheet metal an eighth inch too short along the entire bottom edge. My momentary power button is a "door bell".

davisdelo's picture
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Joined: 2016 Oct 31

I really like a good tower, the MDD and G5 being my favorites. It's fun to see how much you can push these old machines, and the towers tend to give you a lot more options in doing that.

BryMD's picture
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Joined: 2018 Jul 2

First: Props on an awesome thread, Dimitris!

As for the answer to your question, it depends on whether we're talking vintage or modern:

For modern systems, it DEFINITELY has to be the Mini form-factor, as it is the computer in my household with the most uses BY FAR:

1. Connected to my 24TB 5-bay DAS RAID as a wireless file-server.
2. Connected to my wall-mounted OLED TV for big screen computing.
3. Connected to my set-top box via ethernet for pass-through WiFi.
4. Running both Plex Server and Plex Client as a media center.
5. Running a custom version of EMUlaunch and Xbox 360 Wireless Controller Driver as a game station.
6. Running my very own 'Hardcover' iTunes visualizer for music during parties.
7. Running my very own 'Exhibition' screen saver as a slooooow cycling wall art display during everyday living.

And all of this hidden out of plain sight, as only the Mini can do Wink

As for vintage systems I TOTALLY adore my G4 Quicksilver Tower, but, after beginning to use OS 9 on a regular basis, I always seemed to end back at my iMac G4 All-in-One simply because it takes the least table-space while still being one of the more powerful OS 9/OS X dual-boot machines out there Smile

So, simply put: Mini for modern use, All-in-One for vintage use - WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT? Tongue

os9er's picture
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Me, I prefer portability as well as a larger screen, so I'd have to go with any model of the PowerBook line if we're talking vintage, preferably the G3/G4 series; for more modern systems, I definitely prefer the MacBook Pro 15-inch/17-inch line.

nil0bject's picture
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1. Classic
2. LCII
3. PowerMac 6200
4. iBook clamshell
5. G5 tower

jgarcia1991's picture
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Joined: 2018 Mar 12

First post here but I just had to add my appreciation for the 9600 as well. Those were the ultimate Macintosh machines back in the beige days. I know the G3 MT had beefier specs but the 12 RAM slots and 6 PCI slots were and still are very impressive. Not to mention the upgrade able CPU to G3/G4!

Jatoba's picture
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Joined: 2018 Apr 16

Normally, I like the most powerful line of a given Macintosh model. For instance, among Mac minis, I'll always prefer the 1.5Ghz model with 64MB VRAM. For the Power Macintosh line, the G5 Quad Core. Those two Macs are precisely the only Macs I currently own, as well. (RIP my iMac G3 and G3 WallStreet PowerBook, as well.)

Following this logic, I'm also interested in the 1.67 GHz laptop PPC models, and the latest iMac G5 model, as well. A PowerMac G4 MDD for OS 9 would be pretty rad for me to have, as well, especially if a 2.0GHz Sonnet processor upgrade could be located for it (I think it reaches 2.0GHz via overclocking). There's also the XServe line, but somehow that one doesn't interest me as much. A 2.7GHz Dual-Processor G5 would be pretty rad, too, but few of these survived, and those that did are probably never gonna be sold.

On a somewhat related note, the YDL Workstation and the Talos II line of computers interest me very much, as well, but those I simply cannot begin to even consider for the next 10 to 20 years. No exaggeration. If they are still around then (and if I am still around then!), then it'd be an awesome investment.

But I'm not getting any new Mac model anytime soon. However, in practice, the 2 models I own are probably my favorite Mac models ever.
The Mac mini is portable and powerful, and since 2018, it can even run OS 9. It's my definitive Mac OS 9 machine, and I grew to completely love it for all sorts of reasons. It is even MorphOS capable, and like the other NewWorld ROM Macs, it's very GNU/Linux and BSD compatible.
Meanwhile, there's the absolute beast that the G5 Quad is. As far as OS X is concerned, I purely only care for Tiger and Leopard, which is just perfect for this machine. It also runs all those 64-bit GNU/Linux and BSD systems that Mac mini and the laptops won't.

68k Macs I find very awesome, but for all my classic Mac and 68k needs, I'm more than content with the built-in 68k emulator and Mac OS 9 on my mini. But I do have Basilisk II set up for use anywhere on my PSPs and PSVita, which are an absolute delight to bring about everywhere.

If I had 68k Macs, I'd prefer the model with the best 68030 processor. I wouldn't want it to have 68040 processor, because those don't run most 24-bit apps, but only 32-bit-clean ones, AFAIK.
If I had such a Mac, I'd like to invest on building up resources & software for SSW 7.5.5, for being able to run both 24-bit and 32-bit apps, and Mac OS 8.1 for being the latest 68k OS. The latest version of Apple's A/UX would also be a must for me, had I such hardware.
With that said, both SSW 6 and 3 would be interesting too, at least for older 68k hardware. The latter because it's the latest SSW compatible with the very first original Mac model. Officially, anyway.

... And after I'm got done with my ramble, only now I realize I slightly misread what this topic is about (it's about the CASES, not the actual Macs). Whoops. Do I delete this wall of text?! Laughing out loud

Answering the question: The PowerMac G5 Quad Core's case, most definitely. So spacey and organized. So well-designed. Cool to touch. Beautiful, inside and outside.
Although the PowerMac G4 case is goddamn sexy, too. Wouldn't mind hugging one. LOL