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cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17
Where can our old Macs download and upload our files to/from our old/new computers?

I know, it sounds silly, but here's where I'm going: what online services work w/Classila to download/upload files with?

My problem is that with the one file server I'm running on my Chromebook at home is not communicating at all with Classila, so outside of maybe Dropbox which I'll try shortly, has anyone had any luck using any particular service(s) for files transfer?

I will get plenty for my Powerbook to eat from the Garden soon enough, but for a good number of files, it'd simply be easier to dump those files from my drives through my Chromebook onto my Comet online somehow ( I just don't have any other old Mac to do a SCSI target disk mode transfer or an optical disk drive ). Another thought I had was using a dav-compatible service where I can use the web and the sole classic dav client on the PB as an alternate option.

So if anyone has any ideas or suggestions, I'd appreciate any and I'll definitely try them out! Smile

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24bit's picture
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Joined: 2010 Nov 19

What about setting up a FTP server and connecting to it with some FTP client?
I was using Software Data Cable as FTP server on droid devices and Filezilla as Client in WIN and OSX.
I presume there will be a FTP server for your ChromeBook?

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

I haven't found a ftp server for chromeos yet, but I managed to download from my chromebook's http file server!

Basically I gave my files very short names and then typed the complete url path onto classila. So I though, "how about trying to get the file directly instead" a lot like download managers like Monica and fetch do.. success! I figured that since classila didn't display anything on the page, it didn't say that it couldn't find the page so there was a good chance it was connecting to the server, and luckily it was! Smile

I hope what I ust wrote makes sense, lol Wink

24bit's picture
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Joined: 2010 Nov 19

My bad, maybe.
I was under the impression that Google opened the Android App Store for Chrome devices.
Whether Software Data Cable would actually work, is uncertain unless somebody tries.

greystash's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 19

I use a NAS drive to connect my classic macs to to my other machines and it works really well! Super fast

IIGS_User's picture
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Joined: 2009 Apr 8

Nice idea!

How to connect to the NAS drive from the classic Mac OS versions?

BryMD's picture
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Joined: 2018 Jul 2

You usually can run a plethora of protocols simultaneously from NASes, including FTP. Synology definitely supports it, and probably most others as well. Was seconds away from buying a Synology myself a year ago, but ended up with a DAS RAID (via my Mac Mini media center/server) instead, as I got tired of waiting for Synology to update its hardware. I assume they’ve updated their hardware by now, or?

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

what nas model do you use, greystash?

do you connect your classic macs as a download-only http server, a mix-n-match ftp server, or more like a dropbox/dav file server? are your macs all OS 9 machines or do they include 68ks as well?

thanks for sharing, it gives the rest of us fellow classic mac users a little hope! Smile

adespoton's picture
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Joined: 2015 Feb 15

I have a Mac Mini G4 running 10.5 Server, but it's also running an AppleTalk 1.0 server. This theoretically allows LocalTalk networking including file sharing, messaging, and printing, but I don't have an Asante localtalk bridge (or currently any LocalTalk-era Macs) to network into it. But this server is able to theoretically talk with everything from an Apple //GS running GSOS right through to my Mojave Mac. It has FTP access as well, of course.

Back in the day, I set up a null modem cable and had my older Macs networked in from Serial via a modem (the server pretended to be the other side of the connection, so the classic Mac talked to the 57.6k modem, and the modem talked directly through a null cable to the USB port. If I re-did this today, I'd probably do some sort of bluetooth dongle instead of the modem; bluetooth can still talk old-school serial as well as USB serial and Bluetooth direct to OS.)

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Wow!

The most I've done is connect a Mac OS X Leopard Mac to System 7 over ethernet and wifi; I've also used QuickPopup, also ( formerly ) known as MacPopup, a LAN-based messaging program folks can use to message between their computers, which also works great in offices with a wide-array of operating systems, even ancient ones like System 7, how cool is that! Cool

greystash's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 19

Sorry for the slow reply, I don't get email notifications here.

Currently I'm using an Asustor AS1004T, and in the past have used a Netgear ReadyNAS NV+.

Both of these support AFP so I can connect to the NAS drive with the Network Browser application. All I do is open Network Browser, select connect to server, enter the address of my NAS (e.g. 192.168.1.6), then it gives me a list of volumes which I can choose to mount.

You can also set up FTP, HTTPS servers etc. but I have found AFP to be the fastest by a long shot. Can transfer a 5GB file to my OS9 Quicksilver G4 in under 4 minutes (miles faster than USB!).

I've had no issues with resource forks being destroyed etc. and have used these volumes on all systems: OS8, OS9, OSX 10.3 - current, Windows 10.

I have found this the best method by far to transfer/sync files to and from Mac OS Classic. It's also great to have 8TB of space to play with on my classic Macs!!

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

OMG, 8TB? SWEET!! NOW you're talking! Laughing out loud

Now we need a BF deal to score some of this killer hardware Wink

muttztfz's picture
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Joined: 2010 Dec 2

I use a NAS and a Linux PC. On both there is an AFP server running. On Linux the program is called netatalk. It has to be configured properly. Version 3.0 of netatalk cannot provide AFP over AppleTalk any more, only over TCP, which is good for everything that is called Mac OS (Mac OS 7.5 and up, including Mac OS X).

But I get you, I had the same problem. How on earth do get those files over to the (old) Mac? External HDDs? Mine are mostly formatted as NTFS volumes, which is not a problem on Mac OS X, especially not with NTFS-3G. But what to do with Mac OS 9? And since I have all my computers in the home network, AFP was the answer...

adespoton's picture
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Joined: 2015 Feb 15

There’s a good VM Linux distro centred around netatalk linked on emasculation. Personally I’ve always used one of three methods depending on the age of the systems: for pre-Ethernet, xterm via a null modem cable from serial to USB, for newer ones with Ethernet, FTP over Ethernet or connecting the HDD directly.

I do have a chaining system I used for a while where a Mini G4 was connected via FireWire to a Core 2 Mini, but this combo was still to limited for moving between most of the other systems.