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cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17
My love for Classic Macs and the MG!

I think many who frequent these forums not only have neat stories to tell about their times in front of an older Mac or a virtual one. Thanks to the brilliant efforts of others, we all now get to enjoy the later!

As far as emulation, old Mac software sites like the MG, Emaculation.com, LowEndMac.com, System7Today.com, and so many other sites too many to list them all, they all bring people together to relive the magic and simplicity of the Classic Mac OS.

In these forums, some have made contributions to make new Mac software, fix unusable titles due to registration, helped one another simply run emulators and real Macs. To me the Macintosh Garden is the ultimate unofficial Mac User Group, lol. No registration dues needed to share Mac ideas, stories, retired software and help each other do what we love doing, playing and working with the Mac OS GUI, extensions and software.

I just want to thank everyone here for being as awesome as you all are Smile and at a time like this, you make it much easier to be alone together!

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lilliputian's picture
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Joined: 2010 Jul 29

It's nice having a little community dedicated to the work of archiving and preservation!

systemseven's picture
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Joined: 2016 May 19

i like that a wide variety of enthusiasts come here, my focus is on music and animation, someone else may really like adventure games and someone else loves accounting programs, etc etc. i find it more interesting when i can see what other people are passionate about too, instead of just a super focused group that only cares about one kind of game or app

OpenSourceMac's picture
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Joined: 2019 Jan 21

When I first starting using Macs, they were the Beige G3s. Wasn't super impressed. But then came the Blue and White ones, and the Clamshell iBooks. I saw a Clamshell G3 iBook fall down a 60 ft. STONE staircase at my college (smacking the stairs at least 15 times), and it landed open like an A-Frame house.

An attendant picked it up and it turned right back on and worked perfectly (didn't even have any serious cosmetic damage) - AND I WAS SOLD. Later G4s kept getting better and better.

The G5s were a colossal misstep I.M.O., and Mavericks (10.9) and up are NOT my cup of tea, but from 1999 to about 2015, they had a hell of a run.

Lauri's picture
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Joined: 2020 Sep 4

The very best (or exciting) were the first three ! They could not be used for anything productive, really ... or maybe the Plus could to some extent ... but the style and design, that was something we had never seen before!

OpenSourceMac's picture
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Joined: 2019 Jan 21

At the time, a G3 could easily outperform my Win98 box with Pentium III (500 Mhz).

MikeTomTom's picture
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Joined: 2009 Dec 7

Lauri was referring to the 1st Macs from 1984+ (128k, 512k, Plus) - not those newfangled wiz-bang machines Wink

Myself, I went from beige G3 to QS G4, missing out on the B/W G3 towers in-between. I wish I had owned a B/W though, beautiful to look at and excellent Mac's, all around top class machines.

Troyd's picture
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Joined: 2014 Nov 14

As an owner of one, they are nice to look at but they are a heap of unreliable junk. A halfway house between old world and new world Macs and beyond temperamental. Only really worth getting if you love troubleshooting.

adespoton's picture
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Joined: 2015 Feb 15

Yeah... purchased new, my Macs were:
Mac Plus (would recommend, but always had SE envy)
Mac Colour Classic (would NOT recommend; the Colour Classic II was what I really wanted)
iMac DV SE (was an excellent Mac whose slot load drive started to die, so I took that as a sign to upgrade)
iMac G5 (This Mac was AWESOME but sadly never had an OS that took full advantage of its potential)
2009 iMac (Lasted well, until I decided to go to laptops)

Finally, eventually I ended up with enough disposable income to begin buying the used Macs I'd always wanted. I'm still missing an SE/30 and a TAM though.

I've never desired one of the G3 towers. My DVSE did pretty much everything they did in a more compact package, and my G5, while it was limited to OS X, was a powerhouse.

The observant among you will notice that I skipped right from 68030 to G3. Sort of. I had a PDS accelerator for my Colour Classic, and modified the logic board for 640x480 resolution. I had plans to solder on another DAC chip to support stereo sound, but never got there before I eventually sold on my hotrodded paperweight to another enthusiast.

Bolkonskij's picture
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Joined: 2009 Aug 3

Hah, you can do so much stuff with a Mac Plus (or even a 512Ke for that matter) even other than playing retro games. It just a matter of getting used to it, accepting the challenge and exploring things Smile

I totally dig systemseven's comment about learning how others use their systems. That's what I find inspiring too.

I feel a lot of knowledge has been lost and while the Macs are still capable of what they used to be, it's the users who are not. The users changed. More precisely: Their behavior changed. Here's an example: Who else remembers just opening MacPaint and drawing something ... like the lamp on your desk. Why? Just because you could draw it in a computer! Yes, there were 2462 adress managers written in Hypercard. That didn't stop us from writing the 2463rd - because it was our personal one. And because we could do it.

At a certain point Mac users lost the creativity and this "epic foolishness" that made them such a nice amiable bunch and drew me to them. Creating things for the sake of creating - not because you can make 9.50$ by selling it on Fiverr. Accept a challenge because there was one! It has been absorbed into playing Fortnite and posting self-idolizing images on Instagram. (yeah, generalizing, but you hopefully get the idea)

It's places like the Macintosh Garden and others where I find the remnants of this spirit and I totally love it. I just wish we'd get an even more creative bunch, with new fanzines, new wallpaper pages (or a wallpaper section on the Garden including user upload, @fogwraith Smile ), 1bit pixel art sections, new software, newly composed music using Studio Session etc. etc.

Bottom line: Don't be just a consumer. That's cool too at time. But let's recreate the old Macs scene bursting with creativity again. Code, draw, compose! And above all, have fun doing so Smile

fogWraith's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 23

Stop piling work on me Wink

Bolkonskij's picture
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Joined: 2009 Aug 3

I haven't even started yet! Laughing out loud .. you should do what I told you this morning, then you'd have the time for implementation! Wink

Lauri's picture
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Joined: 2020 Sep 4

>> Hah, you can do so much stuff with a Mac Plus (or even a 512Ke for that matter)

Hey! Now you sparked my interest! Can you elaborate a bit, what kind of productive work you do with the first models? I remember that I used my half-sef-made (I told the story elsewhere I think) 512 for writing texts ... ideas, some young man angst, maybe even a couple of novels, things like that ... and for programming some quite basic software with Lightspeed C ... what else? I will update if I remember...

But if I remember correctly the Desktop publishing had not arrived yet ... or was it, maybe it was close.

Macpaint was a great accomplishment, from a programmers point a view ... and the source code was released some time ago, it was a good read Smile But back then, I could not really use it for anything that I would call useful.

But I'm thinking about other things than writing and playing games. Ah yes! Playing games can actually be "productive", too! Absolutely Smile

Tell me, what kind of stuff you were referring to Smile

I probably missed something, but as always, I'm eager to learn something new. And of course, the word "productive" can mean different things in different contexts. Haha! Interesting.
 
>> And above all, have fun doing so

I can speak on behalf of myself: I am having fun Smile Finding this site, remembering emaculation and contacting some other fellows (some old friends, some that I got to know now) has probably been the best thing that happened to me during this year.

Lauri

z970's picture
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Joined: 2016 Aug 26

We've had a wallpaper section for over a year.

https://macintoshgarden.org/apps/powerpc-wallpapers

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

The very first Macs I used were the Macintosh SEs running some version of System 6. Word and MacWrite and MacDraw apps were all staples, followed by some fun little games and DAs and fonts.. and laser printing, wow.. remember, the campus had resources, no the students (for the most part), lol!

Back then when I was new to true computing, I felt like I ruled the world!

MikeTomTom's picture
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Joined: 2009 Dec 7

My first Mac was an SE with a 1.4MB "SuperDrive" and a 20MB HD ! It came to me brand new as a hand-me-down, an unwanted prize won in a small town golfing tournament Wink

I loved it. It opened up the world of Macintosh computing for me. I installed System 7.0 onto it when it was the latest Mac OS. I got to see my first web page on it using MacWeb and sent my 1st email with it via Eudora. I added an external SCSI NEC 3x speed CD-ROM reader, and could then access CD-ROM's. I also added a (300 DPI) mono HP LaserJet 4ML to the collection and I was then set for life. Smile

MacTouch's picture
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Joined: 2016 Mar 19

My very 1st Mac was a LC475, but I discover the Apple world with a Mac IIfx. Smile It wasn't on my own, but professional. So, I was transfixed by the mechanical of a floppy drive when mouting and unmounting such volumes. I found that so "magic"... There were a lot of SE/30 in this place, but my preferred Mac was a modular one. I always liked that kind of machines since this era. Big screen with many colors... Well, this was nearly 30 years ago now and just before the release of the famous System 7. This was an opportunity to discover even more that world with the "ApplExpo" (like Macworld) in France... Later, I shared a large collection of Mac softwares (inside CD-ROM) with friends. I've lost most of them, but they're now at least in the Garden, and I wish, forever...

snes1423's picture
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Joined: 2020 May 13

i feel like one of the things people need is .docx plugin for office 4.2

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Classic PPC Macs can run Office '97, which I do remember had a third-party .xdoc converter. I don't remember off-hand which way it worked anymore!

The other two .doc converter tools came directly from Microsoft to go between older Word 3-5 formats, Word 6 formats and then to the newer MS Word '97 formats. These installed on different MS Word versions and worked inside the program, opening and/or saving files to from or to different Word versions.

In total, they were three .doc conversion tools. The .docx converter I believe was a stand-alone converter so it did not require Word to convert files and ran in Mac OS 8.6 and 9.x, from what I remember.

SkyCapt's picture
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Joined: 2017 Jan 11

PowerMac Mirror Door had a near death scare. It stopped booting all versions of OSX including install discs and stopped booting Morph and ASD, but it boots and runs OS9 and AHT. Resetting the Pram didn't help. Turned out to be a bad USB cable, an extension cable in the USB2 PCI card to create front accessibility and relieve wear of the card. The OSes that wouldn't boot any longer we're all OSes to recognize USB2 whereas OS9 and AHT are USB1-only and ignorant of USB2.

The extension cable I was using turned out to be so old that it wasn't compliant with USB2 needs, I was plagued with intermittent USB2 crashes for a long time. Finally the cable developed some kind of short inside which stopped all OSX booting but OS9 kept going fine.

snes1423's picture
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Joined: 2020 May 13

i was talking about making it part of the application possibly as a extension

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Got it! That would be neat Smile finding that stand-alone app may provide some clues as to how that document format could be translated. The .docx format should have some relation to the html or xml web formats.

I remember that with Microsoft's introduction of Word '97, the word processor could save word files as html and the html created could then be read and edited as a Word file. It was as if Word docs had become html docs, although I imagine that worked best with the Internet Explorer of that time period. So it makes it seem as if their file format has a lot of compatibility with web document formats, which may help in all this. Again, it's a few floors above my pay grade (area of knowledge) here!

Dimitris1980's picture
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Joined: 2009 Apr 21

Macintosh garden is the best Macintosh abandonware site me. Before this, there was another Macintoshgarden site where i found it back to 2007. It was a night at my home and i wanted to search for the first time ever a Macintosh emulator. There weren't many games. For instance there were about 10-15 adventure games to download but the titles were great: Monkey Island series, Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis, Gabriel Knight etc. I am into computers since 1986. I started with an Acorn Electron, then Amstrad CPC464, PC and Super Nintendo. A friend of mine had Atari ST520, another one Amiga 500 and another one Spectrum 128+. I was buying computer magazines and i was playing games. But i hadn't any experience with Macs. An adventure game impressed me in 90s because there were only two versions: IBM PC and Macintosh. Wow! Probably Macintosh was a powerful machine because this adventure game wasn't released for Amiga, i thought. Also i was impressed when i read that also on Macintosh computers the game supports 256 colours. I tried to run the emulators but it was difficult and when i managed to do it, i didn't like the result. I was so curious to see a Macintosh computer with all these games that i lived back to 90s. So i bought my Imac 20" in 2008 of April and then i started collecting retro macs. I was searching and i was reading and i learned a lot. Also the Mac games impressed me because most of them are technically better than other formats. Better graphics, better sound quality. The power of the PCs is the huge variety of games that they have and also the Roland and General Midi support on lots of games. Right now i have the following:

- Imac G3 500mhz
- Powerbook 540c
- Macintosh LC475
- Macintosh Performa 6116CD (with Sonnet G3 500mhz installed)
- Power Macintosh G3 Minitower (x2)
- Powermac G4 MDD

- Cyrix Dos/Windows PC

- Roland MT32, Roland CM64, Roland Sound Canvas SC55, Roland Sound Canvas SC88, Yamaha MU50.

- Roland MT32 is connected on my Performa 6116CD and on my Cyrix PC.
- Roland Sound Canvas SC88 is connected only on my Performa 6116CD.
- Roland CM64, Roland Sound Canvas SC55 and Yamaha MU50 are connected only with my Cyrix PC.

- Soon i will have an Amiga 500.

- I am really happy with my collection and almost every day i turn on my Performa 6116CD or my Power Macintosh G3 Minitower or my Cyrix PC (the other computers are in my basement) even i do not have time to play Smile.

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Shock lucky! Tongue haha, I wish my retro-Mac collection was so nicely spread.. I really can't complain having a Pismo and 2400c though Wink