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ticky's picture
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Joined: 2020 Jul 31
More robust upload method?

Hi there, I'm trying to upload a zipped toast image of my late-model PowerBook G4's restore DVD, but I've had quite a time trying to get it uploaded.

I've noticed the upload form on this site doesn't work at all in Safari, for whatever reason, throwing a JS error when I try to upload anything.

Trying it in a Chromium-based browser got me as far as waiting several hours for it to upload, and thereafter getting a generic JSON response back with { "data": "" }, which is not particularly helpful either.

Am I missing something here? Is there an FTP/SFTP/something else way I should be doing this?

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MikeTomTom's picture
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Joined: 2009 Dec 7

You could try this suggestion made by fogWraith

Myself, I've had better success with splitting DVD images into smaller (500MB) chunks before uploading.

Duality's picture
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Joined: 2014 Mar 1

I've not had too much trouble with uploads from recent builds of Firefox and Safari (14).

When the files are CD-ROM sized, in absence of a progress bar, I use any tool that can track how much data a process has uploaded to get an idea of how much longer it has to go. The network tab of Activity Monitor on macOS works fine, Linux has many many options there. Usually I just go and do anything else while keeping the tab selected in a browser window just in case that browser tries to do something sneaky with saving power and throttling JavaScript.

Dual layer DVDs are a pain in the absence of high speed upload bandwidth. There, as MTT says, splitting the archive file is the way to go. The command line tool "zip" goes well above and beyond Mac OS X's Finder to do exactly that. StuffIt can do the same for sit files on older Mac OSes.

ticky's picture
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Joined: 2020 Jul 31

Yeah, Chrome and Edge both show a progress percentage in the status bar for file uploads, so I know it finished, just that the server got confused.

It also doesn’t seem to be an issue with bandwidth on my end; I’ve got very, very speedy fiber with a solid upload. Uploading the same file to my own web server from the same network took minutes, not hours.

Honestly, having downloaded a split archive of a DVD image from here I’d rather not do that if I can avoid it, it’s a pretty unweildy process, and it seems like the Garden’s servers throttle your download speeds if you make multiple simultaneous connections, making for a much more hands-on experience if you want it finished quickly. But that might just be me being picky. Tongue

Duality's picture
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Joined: 2014 Mar 1

Upload bandwidth might be relative? I've seen folks raise that as a problem elsewhere, but I haven't seen numbers shared with that.

Back when I was uploading DVDs, I had 100Mbps upload which worked perfectly. Now I'm working with a tenth of that, which somehow qualifies for "high speed" in some markets but it is absolutely nothing of the sort!

On 10Mbps upload, I've seen problems with uploading files... the ones where an upload session for a DVD image drags out for more than five hours before the server has to cancel it. The Garden is definitely not as quick to receive files as Amazon S3. My first hand experience is that the rate of the upload does scale to a fraction of your available upload speed.

ticky's picture
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Joined: 2020 Jul 31

I’m seeing around 260-300KB/s up to the Garden now I’m using something other than a browser, and we have an advertised 300Mbit/s (so ~37MB/s) symmetrical connection.

Speed tests even over Wi-Fi reliably get us in the mid 200Mbit/s (~25MB/s) ranges, with a test I did just now (while uploading to the Garden!) netting 220Mbit/s (~27MB/s) up.

I’m not asking for the use of all of that speed, but this feels more like a trickle than it ought to be Innocent

fogWraith's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 23

I should probably have a look at the server and do something about it since it will have a more permanent installation later, might as well get cracking sooner than later Wink

The one you're uploading to is in Sweden (quite the distance), running Snow Leopard Server on a Mac Mini Core 2 Duo that hasn't been rebooted in... forever? The disk that accepts uploads is connected via USB... so I'm pretty sure that the speeds could be much greater than what they are at the moment Tongue

But yeah, if this method really works then I'll start working on upgrading to new hardware and move some stuff around to increase performance / speeds

fogWraith's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 23

Hmm no, that error message isn't very helpful in debugging either, it's very tricky.

We have this method available, but there has been little response on that, quite frankly I haven't even checked that particular server in quite a while so function is unknown but it seems to at least respond.

ticky's picture
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Joined: 2020 Jul 31

This looks somewhat more promising, I'll give that a shot and let you know how it goes! Thanks

fogWraith's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 23

Let me know if there are any issues.
It is widely untested and may require more work, perhaps even user accounts for more privileges than what already exists.

ticky's picture
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Joined: 2020 Jul 31

I don’t suppose there’s anything that can be done to help with the Safari error messages? It seems like the actual upload request succeeds, but the progress data returned by the server never changes.

I dug in further while drafting this response, and discovered that the server is returning the uploaded file JSON as text/html rather than application/json (it probably shouldn’t be, but it seems like this is Drupal internal stuff, and not usually likely to be a problem), and it turns out the Wayback Machine extension for Safari will inject itself into any response which is text/html, including XMLHttpRequests. Tired So, uninstalling that.