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mrdav's picture
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Joined: 2011 Dec 3
To members who have difficulty uploading CD images

A number of members are unable to upload image files of CDs because their internet connection is too slow. Others are unable to image mixed mode CDs for a variety of reasons. One possible solution to this would be to duplicate the CDs (easily done regardless of the type of CD) and to ask a member, who regularly uploads here, if they would be willing to receive the duplicate CDs by regular mail, and then to process them for upload here, and then to do the upload. Certainly, I would be willing to receive such requests, and I am certain that many other members would be willing also. Just a thought.

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WhosIt.There's picture
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Joined: 2014 Aug 23

A good idea. Unfortunately with 200+ magazine cover floppy disks, CDS, and DVDs, it would probably be cheaper for me to simply upgrade to a fibre broadband connection. Wink

rbshep's picture
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Joined: 2020 Mar 5

Also... I understand the desire for 'on machine' compatibility - but it's not fun at all waiting an hour and a half for stuffit expander to decompress a CD's worth of data.

I really don't know why it's so slow, but it seems exponential - a 50mb file will decompress in a round a minute - but a 500mb file won't take 10 minutes, more like an hour.

Unlike disk copy images, there's no need to preserve the resource fork of a 'toast' image - it's just a raw dump of the CD's data track, in 2048 byte-per-sector format (as one could obtain with DD).

Even bin / cue images (for preserving audio tracks etc.) can be converted to 2048 byte-per-sector format within OS9 using binchunker.

Can we not change the guides to ask users to use another format? Zipped Toast should be fine in 9 surely?

MacNiels's picture
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Joined: 2020 Jan 10

I nowadays ZIP the larger Toast/ISO/CDR images as well. Other than a custom icon being lost, the image works just fine in OS9. You can just drag it on Toast or Virtual CD Util, or whatever program. The data is just fine.
If a purist insist, they could maybe "fix" the image by altering the type/creator with one of the many utilities that can do that (not tried).
I agree unstuffing the a 500 MB .sit image can take long. On my G4/1.25 it can take up to 20 minutes. But even on my 2018 iMac, it's not really that much faster!
I only keep stuffing the small disk images.

fogWraith's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 23

It's been a while since this was first posted, still as relevant now as it was then in regards to taking requests for imaging media. I've been offered material in the past and offered to pay for shipping both ways though interest has always been lost by the other party since it requires one to visit the post office and shipping across the pond. Results sometimes being less than desireable.

As for compression of various media, most of the time it's up to the contributor to decide wether or not compression is really needed. Taking ISO / Toast images into consideration, sometimes you save a couple of megabytes on compressing, other times you can save hundreds (in the case you save a whole lot on compression it is the preferred format).

So usually it's situational since we can accept different formats as long as it doesn't blast resource forks.

Even though I've invested in new hardware, we can hold a whole lot more data today than previously, saving space is still nice (and smaller downloads is also a plus where some have poor bandwidth) Smile

rbshep's picture
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Joined: 2020 Mar 5

I just don't get why we insist on stuffit to most people for these (by 90's standards) HUGE files when it performs so abysmally on them.

I'm a fan of using macbinary or binhex to preserve resource forks myself Wink e.g. My iDVD upload

And i haven't used DiskCopy compression in this instance, but i could have Smile

fogWraith's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 23

Again, situational and depending on how much one saves on compressing Smile
ISO, Toast, CDR and such can be attached to pages, the only limit is the soft limit of 8GB per file

rbshep's picture
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Joined: 2020 Mar 5

And whether it will take over an hour to extract, or could be available to the user within minutes Wink

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

All so true, and of course, all of it goes both ways where at times its the user's setup.

As a perfect example, my Chromebook Android laptop is limited to 16gb of storage for everything running on the device, including all the Android apps and Mac emulator. On top of that my router stopped working, so I remote into my Windows desktop using my phone's hotspot, which has limited bandwidth.

In my scenario, compressed files save me both my hotspot's bandwidth and figuring out how to deal with a very slow and over-sized installer. Why else would I have shrunk a Photoshop 4 install down to less than 9mb? I figured the tiny load would not be a burden to the servers as long as it served a worthwhile purpose.