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OpenSourceMac's picture
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Joined: 2019 Jan 21
Mac Studio Monitors and Colormatch RGB are STILL KING.

Recently setup a big canvas print job and have always stuck with Colormatch RGB for my colorspace and convert to sRGB as needed (via old-school Perceptual Intent). I keep hearing how printing "Still improving" and sure enough my spiffy 4K TV can show a lot wider range (especially in darks) and for once I went with it and Adobe CS6 to do my setup. Well low and behold, the old monitor totally called the result closer and better than the new system with the bells and whistles.

Have done 4 big tests over the years on everything from web to RGB Lambda prints and for actual, realistic color, nothing beats Colormatch and a good Apple ADC display. What you see is what you get.

To those who say: "Someday we'll be able to print 100% of Adobe RGB" I say enjoy your washed-out boring prints. "I want good color NOW with what currently exists."

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davisdelo's picture
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Joined: 2016 Oct 31

I did most of my years in printing on the photographic side and can say for sure that AdobeRGB is crap. I never understood how people justified using such a inflated color space that had such glaring compromises in real working gamut. My preferred color setup is typically ProPhotoRGB and Relative Colormetric. I find it to be very flexible and have never had the color issues I see people struggle with when using AdobeRGB.

adespoton's picture
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Joined: 2015 Feb 15

AdobeRGB was supposed to be a compromise that provided decent CMYK colorspace approximations within RGB. Whenever I've used it as intended, I've got exactly the color output I expected. Unfortunately, the colorspace it guarantees is severely limited. If I work in AdobeRGB and convert to CMYK, it's got pretty accurate output prediction. However, that output is... not ever what I actually want.

I've found Relative Colormetric to be pretty good; these days I don't do much serious work in any colorspace though, and just stick to sRGB when I need something.

OpenSourceMac's picture
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Joined: 2019 Jan 21

Adobe recommends Relative, but honestly you windup needless damaging saturation in colors that render brighter on a particular material. The advantage of perceptual is the retention of strong dark contrast - that is really critical to proper contrast throughout the print.