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cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17
How do you see your (first) Macs?

For me, I've seen some of my Macs this way, and I'm sure many of us here can see similar connections to their own Macs

Let me start w/the Macs I've had: after using a dual-floppy SE in college, I was so hooked! I took a Classic II w/me abroad and returned w/a Quadra 605. At work I used a IIci then bought a LC 578 to use w/a new Color StyleWriter, but returned it for a Performa 630 w/an Apple AudioVision 14 display and Apple Adjustable keyboard. I used several PPCs at home, including a 5300/100 LC, PM 8500, PM 6500 and more recently an eMac. I also had many Powerbooks, from a Duo 2300c w/dock, 1400cs, 3400c, G3 Prototype, Lombard and then my beloved Pismo..I loved each and every one of those old Macs! I already posted the Macs I have now here.

So on to my connection w/my Macs: it often has felt somewhat like having a puppy, dog or some other pet at home (especially since I haven't had a chance to own any). It waits for you to get home, you wake it from sleep and scratch behind its ears (by pressing a key to wake from sleep or turn it on), and it often greets you with a bark (the startup chime), you wiggle a stick or bone (the mouse) and it follows you around from room to room around the house (the cursor around the desktop and within each program). You play together in the yard (when you open a game), distracting you from the messes of the day, or allowing you to go for a walk together (launching aol, later on online via a web browser), finally it'd curl on your lap or next to your feet as you read the paper (aol news, news websites/portals, then rss feeds), write some letters (aol mail, later ips email via clients), watching tv or vhs movie/dvd (quicktime/apple video player), view or arrange a picture album (quicktime picture viewer/jpegview/graphic converter/photoshop), listen to some vinyl, make a mixtape to blast it or the radio on the road (mpegdec/soundjam/sound trekker/flash player/itunes/etc.), while you get some work or tinker project done at your desk or in the garage (word/macwrite/clarisworks/wordperfect/writenow/excel/etc., and illustrator/quark/pagemaker/dreamweaver/etc.) or fixing the car (installing programs, troubleshooting system extensions or tinkering w/resedit/etc.). It finally settles w/you next to your lazyboy for a nap (the Word assistant falls asleep on the screen and then the AfterDark aquarium turns on as it idles).

Has anyone else connected to their Macs in some way, too? How would you relate your experience w/your old or new Mac(s)?

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BryMD's picture
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Joined: 2018 Jul 2

Wonderful new thread you've started, man! So full of heart. I have my story to share here, but your post is such a wonderful read that I'll let it sink in with the rest of the Garden before I (hopefully don't) run this thread completely off of it's tracks as well Smile

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Here, let me help you with running off-track - I added the 5300 to my collection by a shockingly unexpected dumpster dive rescue I simply had to do: the little (ok, not so little) Mac had simply been thrown out just like that; no ceremony, no handing it down to anyone or taking it home, heck even a quick drop-off to Goodwill..nothing.

It was 100% clean, in almost-new condition and worked perfectly! My little one's eyes lit up when I got it ready for her..to think that such computers were being hauled in full working order to landfills, like taking a little puppy to the pound to be immediately put down, was completely heartbreaking..it still hurts whenever I look back.

systemseven's picture
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"quick drop-off to Goodwill" i just wanted to chime in really quickly that not all Goodwills recycle or resell computer equipment. i worked at a Goodwill for a few months and we were under orders to put anything computer related into a trash compactor, for "liability" reasons. you can imagine how much stuff i set aside to keep from being crushed into a tiny cube, but lots of people with good intentions had no idea their old beige PCs were not even being recycled for parts or gold. so please check with any thrift shop before donating! macintoshes arent exactly rare (yet), but we are going to be seeing more that need recapping, battery leak damage, etc.

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Wow! Thanks S7, I never would have thought computers would be thought of as a 'liability' and destroyed anyway. People donating should definitely be warned about that!

It would make more sense to offer it in exchange for shipping on ebay or posted on CL for pickup during one's garage sale as a better way to salvage an old mac for someone else who can use it and will definitely benefit from it. It's such a crying shame that Mac User Groups seem all but dead. I know, it's such a dated platform, but it could help macs move around a bit.

I've received a few free hand-me-downs from other fellow users over the years and I've given several away myself. It just feels so good and right to give something to enrich others, no matter how old it is!

BryMD's picture
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Joined: 2018 Jul 2

Spoken like a true Mac-hero Smile

Ok, here goes nothing: We never had a computer in the house when I was young. Not until I was into my teens did we decide to bring a computer home: A Performa 600. However, this was just before things got truly bad for Apple, and we ended up being one of only 5 households in my town with a Mac - of which 1 was the local newspaper.

I loved that machine to death, but except for a new issue of Mac Format CD every month, it was (understandably enough) close to impossible to get any new games for my teenage self. As such, my digital world quickly started to revolve around graphic design, MOD-tracking and GUI customization. When I think about it, my Performa might have been the sole reason I ended up with the mindset of a creator rather than that of a consumer - even now as an adult.

Anyway, when I, stupidly, decided to donate it some years back, I tried to research the model, only to realize that the specs didn't match up with any known variation of any Performa from that time period: The processor speed was off, the storage space was off, and the CD-ROM drive was off. Asking my parents, they revealed that this had been a display model at the local electronics store that the seller had touted as being brought in directly from the floor of Apple's production facilities in Cork.

Donating this machine broke my heart... but my heart is now finally whole again Smile

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Back to my original analogy, all Macs need love, much like a puppy, lol! I see you loved your first Mac too, Bry! Smile

As a Mac guy back then, it really was no wonder Apple was hurting in '92..I always wondered why Apple made that Performa..it was basically an underpowered IIci! I was overseas close to that time, and let me tell you, that particular Mac was not popular anywhere..it was being sold overseas as the Mac IIvi, we got one and were sorely disappointed at it's specs.

Like the IIvi, the 600's design allowed the motherboard to be upgraded to a couple of Quadras and later on a PPC, the last two based on the same case design. I think Apple's hope was that folks would go for the motherboard upgrade, allowing them to spend a little more as their needs for a faster Mac grew, you know?

Now you mentioned that that floor model's specs didn't match a stock 600; I wonder why that was the case. Do you remember what the unique specs of your Performa were? It would be very interesting to see what they were trying to do with that model..maybe they were trying to make it a bit more jazzy to sell more of them. As a side note, to a Mac user looking to upgrade, this model wouldn't have been too attractive unless they dropped it to clearance prices.

BryMD's picture
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Joined: 2018 Jul 2

Really don't remember most of the discrepancies anymore (donated it way back in 2009), only that it didn't match any registered model in most ways. The only thing I do remember is that my 600 didn't have the denotation 'CD', but still came with a 2x CD-ROM. And that the design of the plastic chassis both surrounding the mono speaker and the entrance to the CD-ROM was visibly different from known 6xx's sold. DEFINITELY Apple-designed, though remarkably different.

Don't know to which extent Cork did any prototyping locally at that time, but, considering Apple's lack of meaningful direction back then, it wouldn't surprise me.

Yeah, it was a horribly underpowered machine. Couldn't even run Wolfenstein 3D in full screen. At least we allegedly got it at 20% off for the simple fact of it being a 'display model' Smile

MadMac's picture
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Joined: 2010 Mar 20

As my first computer, the LCIII was superb... at home nobody let me use it without supervision (they hide the mouse, so hey... welcome keyboard keys) because it was a very expensive machine at 1993, in southamerica.
Very few games (3-5) so i start playing with photoshop 2.5, illustrator, macwrite... mastering most of them that way, playing... i use to love to modify fonts with illustrator and vectorizing pictures, scan photos etc... as you guess it was a graphic designer at home who bougnt it...

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Totally relate w/you, MadMac! I worked in Mac sales during my time out of the U.S. I arrived w/a MUG-full of funware, not counting MW and MacUser floppies, too. So I was a real happy camper w/my Mac..but then again, when wasn't I! I was crazy back then, I'd stack my Classic II's startup screen w/three or more rows of icons 'til it crashed, lol!

Ah, the LC III, what a beauty: nice, low-profile Mac that worked so nicely w/an original 13-inch Trinitron CRT; totally see why they hid that mouse from you! I had the insane pleasure to play w/a wild assortment of Macs and peripherals, both clients and at the shop. The Color Classic was one of my favorites back then, just wished they'd offered it w/the LC III's speed instead of the Classic II. Another was the Quadra 660AV w/DSP, which is when I drooled over the 14" AudioVision display and Adjustable keyboard it was ordered with; talk about a real hot-rod Mac back then!

SkyCapt's picture
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Joined: 2017 Jan 11

Me first Mac was 2000 (years and dollars), shortly after the Return of Steve at Apple. I bought it on the Fourth of July, a major American holiday for a major purchase from a major American corporation. I saw and wanted the PowerMac G3 Blue&White with its flip-down motherboard, but when I eventually got around to buying, the G4 had come out so I bought the new fastest ever 400 MHz PowerMac G4 that had the new "AGP" graphics card (66 MHz interface) 16MB vram, and the new "ATA-66" harddrive (66 MHz interface) 10GB capacity. It was the same flip-down case that I wanted in the Blue&White. Little did I realize (yet) that all the PCI and AGP cards are held upsidedown (resulting in bad heat dissipation), this design deficiency could be corrected by just a mirror image casing in which the left side wall mounts the motherboard and flips down, not the right side. Oh well, Steve.

I wanted the RISC CPU, and something which wasn't "what everyone else uses", PeeCee's. I had used Atari 800 in the 1980s and Amiga 68ks in the 1990s. I'd studied microprocessor architecture and knew the internal ramifications of the Apple's CPU switch in 1994-5 from 68ks to RISC 60x/PowerPC. If not for the Macintosh, I would've bought a Sun-Sparc-Solaris also RISC. These RISC chips perform almost twice as fast as the Pentiums of the same clock frequency, just like how Apple stated in their advertising campaign.

Computer growth was insane back then. In less than a year, CPUs could make above 800 MHz, twice what I'd just bought. I replaced this AGP "Sawtooth" model in 2003 with a PowerMac G4 MDD 1250MHz on its new 166.66MHz FSB and that strange new stuff being called "DDR" RAM, no one has yet acceptably described what that DDR actually is. The MDD2003's really the Mac of mine that has been "shown the love", I still have and use. My first mistake was selling the Sawtooth, for less than a one-week paycheck, I should have kept it. My second mistake was jumping with both feet into OSX and not investing in OS9. I've since worked my way backwards from OSX into OS9, thanks to macintoshgarden, with better appreciation for it that I would not've had back then, before mg/widespread file-sharing of multimegabyte "abandonware".

cbone's picture
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Joined: 2011 Sep 17

Wow! What a journey, SkyCapt! Yes, Steve brought back the fun in Macs Wink

Growing up, my first consoles were the Atari 2600 and the Commodore Vic 20. The arcades were the only other venue for electronics at the time. The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) preceded my journey to bumping into my first BW Macs.

I remember those beautifully powerful UNIX RISC-based SPARC Workstations that Sun, HP, IBM, SGI along with the 'clone wars' of the time like Tatung and Axil. Solaris was a beautiful OS indeed.

What some might not know or remember is that RISC was indeed the holy grail of the NeXT-generation computing, which ironically the NeXT RISC Workstation, NRW, never hit the market. Thankfully Steve gave it birth through the PowerPC Macs..lol, what started out with a ton of shareware finally ended as abandonware!

SkyCapt's picture
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I toyed with Atari model 2600 too in the late 1970s, it was the same "gamepad" (joystick) handhelds and connectors on all three machines 2600, 800, and Commodore Amiga. The 2600 was too underpowered to hold my attention, like it is 1MHz whereas I need 2MHz minimum to enjoy something, and the model 2600 had get this 128 bytes of RAM, not 128K, 128 bytes. It kept the 2-4 kilobyte cartridges as ROM so there never was any loading of program into RAM, therefore extremely low RAM usage was possible. I have loved the 2600 versions of Pitfall! and Adventure, there is just enough wireframe framework to let one's imagination fill in the rest satisfactorily.

SGI? heh, I'm a fan of the "SGI Demo" aka Electropaint.
http://macintoshgarden.org/apps/igs-twisted-screensaver

RISC vs microcoded, instructions vs "tokens", the thing that gave microcoded tokens the advantage at first, in the 1970s and 80s, was the low capacity, low speed, and high price, of RAM. RISC is more RAM-hungry, so microcoded paid for itself not to mention its tokens are more human reader-friendly than RISC instructions are. RISC was widely adopted in the 1990s because improvements in RAM technology began letting RISC be the winner. It's ironic now that chip technology is near its end that due to relatively low on-CPU cache sizes (megabytes here needs gigabytes), microcoded tokens could once again be more desirable concerning what you'd prefer be stored in your CPU cache.

m68k's picture
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Joined: 2016 Dec 30

My first Mac was a half portable Mac II with a 6502 CPU. I can't even remember the model number anymore, as I bought it on a student loan way back in the late 80's and then got so scared by the prospect of paying that (costly!) toy off, that I returned it after only a few weeks ownership.
Many years later my dearest cousin got himself a job at a company that gave "free" 68k & PPC Macs to their employees - which made me jelous and despise Macs even more Wink
Yet back then I knew squatt about Macs - other than the logo and their high price - for I had turned Amiga by that time. Amigas had superior multimedia hardware but - as I must now acknowledge - an inferior operating system when compared to the Mac. Yet the Amiga was still light years ahead of the PC dulldrudgery of IBM, DOS and Windoze 2.11 (yes, before 3.1 there was 2.11).
But that was the next step for me down the ladder of professional surrender, for corporate businesses used PCs and *only* PCs. So out with the Amiga and in with an 8086 "laptop" - with no HD, only black & grey LCD and one 720kb floppy for mass(!) storage.
Its for the memory of those old glory days, when we still thought us geeks could change the world and send the bean counters packing, that I decided to check out how my cousin must have felt, when he "drove" a Porsche with a keyboard and have somebody else pay for it all Smile

SkyCapt's picture
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Joined: 2017 Jan 11

Imo Cadillac not Porsche, "pimp-mobile" ala futurama.

Mac with a 6502 CPU? Is that even possible? Maybe u meant the "Apple ||" computer, it's a 6502. The lowest spec Mac ever made was 68000, right? Even the "Apple Lisa" computer which predated Mac by about a year is a 68000 running at 5 MHz.

Amiga, an inferior operating system compared to Mac? I dunno, depends on the versions/date of versions being compared. Mac came out early 1984 (System 1) whilst Amiga was still being developed in 1985, so Amiga OS 1.0 has years of critical advantage ahead of Mac e.g. Amiga prior to release could "learn" from mistakes which Mac had made. Amiga 1.0 had Multitasking superior to Mac, in which Mac multitasking didn't begin to get any good until like System 5 or System 6, no?

cbone's picture
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The closest I came to the Amiga and its OS was a friend's Commodore 64, but I caught glimpses of its existence when folks would comment on it's video and graphic capabilities in forums.

Amiga has a very interesting history, I hadn't realized that MorphOS, which still sells OS software. Also, like the AOS4, had its roots in the AmigaOS.

SkyCapt's picture
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Joined: 2017 Jan 11

"Commodore Amiga" and "Commodore 64" aren't related hardware, their history is convoluted. Amiga chipset was made by engineers who created the Atari 800 then left Atari, while the Atari ST feels instead like a 16-bit evolution of the Commodore 64 ... switcheroo.

Amiga graphics was so photogenic and legendary that even new games for Mac/PC/others would go and print the Amiga screenshots on their box covers, requiring a disclaimer captioning like "Amiga version shown here".

Wonder if Atari "ST" stands for Sam Tramiel, son of Jack. I also heard this explanation: the "Atari XE" is eXtended Eight bit, Atari "ST" is SixTeen bit, then, the Atari "TT" is ThirtyTwo bits.

m68k's picture
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Joined: 2016 Dec 30

Sorry for my confusion with the nomenklatura:
Yes it was a semi-sluggable Apple II (Macs are not Apple? Wink with a 6502 CPU.
And I still got my Amiga stuff running in AmiKit for Android, so I can compare.
Whilst the Amiga had absolutely superior multimedia hardware and true multitasking abilities, it couldn't even support basic professional standards like PDF, DOC or JPEG.
Try to configure the original Workbench to even support more than 320x200(256) resolution and you'll discover to your great horror, that it doesn't even ship with the right font and icon set to support anything as fancy as 640x480 or higher.
Computer game kids back then thought they entered paradise with 320x200 @4096 colors - but you try to do DTP or even meaningful word processing at that rez and I watch you going crazy over it.
Amigas were meant for play - but never for work. They could have been so much more, but alas Commodore decided otherwise.
With my MacOS 8.1 setup I can work on JPEG, PSP, PS, PDF, RTF and even DOC & XLS files that I can then exchange with any modern day office suite. Might take some extra "save as" steps, but it works.
I couldn't do that even with an up to date MorphOS system - heck, even old OS/2 systems have more professional progs available than "modern" day Amigas. I loved my Amiga, but would I have been born rich, I would have switched to Apple the moment game time was over.

PS: Jack Tramiel bought Atari after he got ousted from Commodore. He then bought the ST technology as a cheap & quick revenge attack against his former company. As a cost cutting measure, he expressily forbade his engineers to put any more resources into development, than was absolutely neccessary to fullfil that purpose.
TOS (Tramiel Operating System) and GEM (the graphical desktop) were two examples of great potential with an absolute minimalistic (=lousy) implementation.
The original purpose for the ST was to ruin Commodore so that Jack Tramiel could get himself (and his sons) back into the driver's seat by simply buying up the wrecked leftovers.
Commodore saw the writing on the wall and did a copy cat by buying the Amiga technology from a young startup and turning it into their own gaming battle machine.
Whilst those young developers around Jay Miner had actually targeted Apple and the multimedia market with their project, Commodore's management was running so scared of their former boss, that they in turn restricted the Amiga devs to develop the system only as a superior competitor to the Atari ST.
Back then Amiga and Atari fanboys hated each other with a vengeages and the flame wars between them from that era were legendary. But in the end the IBM PC (of all systems!) did them both in.

cbone's picture
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Wow, I had no clue about the personal Amiga/Commodore 'who's the best' battle, m68k! Thanks for sharing some of those 'insider' details..that explains so much about why folks were going crazy about Amigas and such! However, I do remember Apple's original campaigns to show the world how 'insanely great' they were, and encouraging the world to 'Think Different', and so here we are Wink

Don't even get me started on the usability side of things, lol! My computing life took a hard hit when hackers hijacked my Windows 7 desktop (literally remoted into it and were navigating my desktop and collecting usernames, passwords, and my personal contact information) within a day had used my paypal account to try to steal over six thousand dollars (that I so didn't have by the way) and it wrecked me. "Never again", I promised myself, so any sensitive online activity goes through my Chromebook now, but running inside of it are all of my old favorites within my Android-driven 68k B-II Mac Smile

Now I can use all of the amazing online tools on Chrome OS and still have Photoshop 4, Freehand, WriteNow, Word 5, Excel, Act! 2.8, PageMaker, and the list goes on..all safe, hack-free, familiar, simple and effective. All my PC does these days is work as a media jukebox and my Mac Mini's one click away via VNC or TeamViewer when I'm away from the house. Old Macs do rock, guys, there's no question about that..I know, were all nuts..nuts about Macs, of course, lol Laughing out loud

m68k's picture
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Back in the day there were few computer magazines covering all 68k based systems within the same paper and the pains they took to try to make Atari ST and Amiga look equally good was only eclipsed by the "calm down - no flame wars" pleas of the editor in the pages for the user comments (which had to be manually printed or even hand written and snail mailed back then!).
For an outsider if was just laughable - but we Fanboys *did* raise a stink everytime someone mentioned a feature of one platform, w/o acknowledging that ours had something similar to offer Smile

And about Windoze: Guess how long it took for my first unpatched Windows XP box (no SP installed) to get hacked on the Net? Less than 60 seconds.

BryMD's picture
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Speaking of Windows: Just remembered the only LAN-party I ever attended back in the day. Brought my (then) brand new iMac DV SE in to an all Windows environment, and ended up having the entire net all to myself for like 5 hours before anyone else even managed to get online.

You really were hard pressed no to fall in love with the Mac back in those days...

BryMD's picture
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Yeah, that Commodore-Amiga-Atari farce was truly something out of this world! Really sad to see two companies with so much potential being so criminally mismanaged Sad

Was green with envy of all my friends rocking an Amiga back in the day (read: GAMES!), and still love the Amiga to this day.

Have a Frankenstein-ed virtual Amiga running on UAE on my Mac with raw Kickstart 3.0 and AGA (placing it somewhere between the 500 and the 1200).

Still is a pain in the behind to load the 'floppies' though... even with boosted floppy disk speed...

WhosIt.There's picture
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I've still got a large pile of real Amiga floppies in the cupboard, but there's no way to actually read them ... short of spending money on an old used Amiga from eBay which may die within days. (Maybe that's an idea for the coding project topic: a way to read Amiga disks in a modern Mac OS X USB floppy disk drive. Wink )

The Amiga was a great computer, but the OS was rather clumsy compared to the Mac's OS and the silliness with the different RAM types caused no end of problems (still does with emulators!). Then of course the imbeciles in Commodore management killed the company. There's still a relatively huge number of fans out there, still making new OSes, software, and hardware, although these days they're "Amiga" in name only since they have none of the custom chips that made the Amiga what it was. The various companies who have over the years owned the Commodore and Amiga brand names have also planned (and thankfully failed) to make mobile phones and TV set-top boxes.

m68k's picture
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You would need a PC floppy drive with freely programmabe track width and a corresponding driver. They sell those in most Amiga webstores these days.

WhosIt.There's picture
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You can (or at least used to be able to) buy a hardware board that lets you access Amiga floppy disks, but it's Windows only and ridiculously expensive.

SkyCapt's picture
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(an Apple || is not a Mac ... ) Wink

That's right, the 1st-generation Amigas were 640x400 max screen resolution, less than our 640x480 now-accepted minimum. Amiga pixels weren't "square" they were rectangular, so 640x480 is more squarish on CRTs of those days. If I recall, Steve Jobs wanted the Macintosh to have very square dimensions to individual pixels.

Anyway, 320x width is only good for "40 columns" of text, not even good enough for acting as a "typewriter". The Atari 800 max resolution was 320x200 monochrome (plus "sprites" and "artifacting") and 128 possible colors to choose from. The Amiga started with 640x400 ability and (a limited palette out of) 4096 colors to choose from, a kickin' upgrade no matter what but the arrival of "80 columns" and its true business-typewriter emulation was well overdue. The 400y limitation of Amiga did not cut into the much needed "80 columns".

Atari seems versed in "revenge" even before Tramiel took over. The Atari game named "Yars Revenge" is in reference to then CEO first name "Ray" and whereas Yars Revenge duplicates the (addictive) gameplay found in "Star Castle" by Cinematronics - a direct competitor to Atari especially in the Vector coin-op games like Asteroids. So "Yars Revenge" is thus "Rays Revenge" upon Cinematronics, and succeeded at becoming a best-seller as Ray+team predicted.

It was sad to see IBM "win" and not only was it the model "PC" but one they named the model "PC Jr." (pee cee junior). I admire what Nolan Bushnell, the founding father of Atari (who once paid Steve Jobs' hourly wage) did, sold his company to Warner Brothers Communication for multi-millions then he began "Chuck-E-cheese" franchise of pizza-restaurant+coinop-arcades.

WhosIt.There's picture
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Amigas were 640x400 max screen resolution, less than our 640x480 now-accepted minimum.

Only in America due to the silly NTSC system. Proper countries Wink using the sensible PAL system had 640x512.

24bit's picture
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Right, but our "Pay Additional Luxury" interlaced video was at flickering 50Hz where "Never The Same Colour" had the slightly better 59,94Hz.

Could´t help myself posting the obvious. Smile
Our A500s or A2000s had been targeted at playing games on our home CRTs in the first place. As soon as getting real work done was on topic, we needed A-Max or the real thing. Sad

WhosIt.There's picture
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I went to university with the creator of the original A-Max software for emulating a Mac on an Amiga (he was working on that in his spare time!). Some of us helped beta test the software on our Amigas, which was also handy for doing some of the computer work when the main university computer lab was too busy or we weren't there. I've probably still got one of the early versions on my pile of Amiga disks. It was an amazing piece of software. He later went on to do the original Mac version of Dragon's Lair.

Part of Commodore's demise was because they didn't know what to do with the Amiga - they simply couldn't decide whether it was a home computer or a business computer.

m68k's picture
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Outside of multimedia/gaming there were very, very few uses for 640x480 mode on Amiga due to the Flicker Interlace problem for anything above 320x200/256. You would literraly break your eyes trying to edit text in that mode. Another outright stupid leftover from the early gaming console concept, which could have been easily fixed, if the management of Commodore would have let them fix it. But to its dying days the Amiga was "abused" to subsidize Commodore's PC division - so they spend as little as neccessary on Amiga development. And Commodore managed to fabricate PCs that sucked even more than those from IBM - and that meant something!

os9er's picture
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My first Mac was an eMac G4/1GHz, passed down from my parents when they bought a 2009 iMac to replace it. I had some really fun times with that thing... but then it got recycled. Then again, I did get an iMac G3/450 DV+ as a replacement - which I thought was even cooler than the eMac just because of the "Indigo" coloring. Smile

cbone's picture
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I had fun on my eMac, I think it was the same model! Mine couldn't boot 9 natively, but I managed to install Leopard and dual boot with Tiger and OS 9 running Classic. I didn't install the OS 9 drivers because I installed OS 9 on a .dmg image and mounted it on startup. The Classic panel found the mounted volume and it was off to the races from there! Laughing out loud