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supernova777's picture
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Joined: 2013 Mar 18
HELP! trying to recover data from old mac SCSI drive

hey guys i could really use some help
what software do i need?
i have an old imprimis 94221 SCSI drive (179MB capacity)
its a SCSI-1 Drive.. i have it connected via 50pin internal scsi cable going to my Adaptec 2906 PCI which is connected to my B+W G3 450
im trying to recover the data from the drive
the drive is spinning + seen on SCSI ID 4 but im not sure it its propeerly terminated
it wont let me mount it.. scsi probe sees the drive but wont let me mount
mt everything i tried.. what else.. fwb toolkit doesnt show the capacity but shows alot of other info specs from querying the drive..
do i need to repair the partition?
does anyone know of something called MFS? that predated HFS?
i need HELP! this drive is ancient and im out of my league here

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scott Praed's picture
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Joined: 2010 Oct 30

Tried repair the partition
What is last SCSI on your SCSI Chain ? At the end of SCSI Chain should be a SCSI Terminated.

Duality's picture
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Joined: 2014 Mar 1

MFS was a format that was only readable by early versions of Mac OS.

I'm going by memory, but I believe Mac OS 7.6 could read MFS 400k disks. Not sure about an entire hard disk drive formatted in MFS.

System 6.0.8 is a safe bet for MFS compatibility.

Believe it or not, there is also a read only MFS extension for Mac OS X Tiger (10.4) that could provide read-only access to MFS disks. You can build from source with Xcode 2.5 and the following project, still hosted on developer.apple.com ; https://developer.apple.com/library/archive/samplecode/MFSLives/Introduc...

That might work on Leopard, I don't believe the driver model changed much for Mac OS X until Snow Leopard/Lion. There's a readme in that Sample Code archive that has instructions for how to use it and what it was made for.

Duality's picture
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Joined: 2014 Mar 1

For more options on dealing with old Mac data; http://siber-sonic.com/mac/newmillfloppy.html

It’s floppy disk focused but many of the techniques discussed for recovering old Mac formatted data also apply to hard disk drives.

I don’t recall if DiskWarrior 2 supports MFS. It is a great tool for recovering data from HFS and HFS+ disks.

sstaylor's picture
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Joined: 2016 Aug 26

I'd try DiskWarrior. It can frequently fix bad partitions, and it will allow you to recover to another volume, so you don't have to wreck (potentially) your old one.

supernova777's picture
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Joined: 2013 Mar 18

ok i will try disk warrior 3 - hopefully it can do something

24bit's picture
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Joined: 2010 Nov 19

SUM II made some miracles happen for me with my Mac II.
http://macintoshgarden.org/apps/sum-ii-symantec-utilities-macintosh
Not sure whether your G3-450 can still run a matching MacOS for SUM II.

Correct SCSI Termination is a must, of course.
I had some Centronics type active terminators for devices missing built in terminators.

adespoton's picture
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Joined: 2015 Feb 15

MFS was the original Mac file system for 400k floppies. It used a flat file structure; folders were only a feature of the Finder desktop and didn’t exist in dialog boxes. It also didn’t address larger storage sizes, so Apple developed HFS specifically for the FDHD drive that pre-dated SCSI. I believe it came in 5, 10, and 20MB sizes, formatted HFS.

MFS was for the Mac 128k and 512k and was no longer used by the time 800k disks and the Plus and XL came along, which included HFS support on ROM (the 128 and 512 required an HFS Init to read HFS disks).

Not sure if this helps you, but I hope it at least provides some context.

os9er's picture
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Joined: 2013 Nov 15

I concur with the above posts about support for MFS... If I had any experience with it, I'd be able to offer some pointers, but I don't. I've run Mac OS versions that use that FS in an emulator, but that's about all Tongue I do, however, also concur with the statement that a standalone SCSI terminator is a must if your drive doesn't have a terminator built-in. One might try looking on ebay or similar sites for one, although I'm not sure about the price point of such items.

Posted from my PowerBook G4/1.67GHz 17-inch w/ Mac OS X 10.4.11 (new acquisition)

adespoton's picture
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Joined: 2015 Feb 15

A SCSI terminator is just a resistor across two pins, so if you need to, you can build one yourself.

supernova777's picture
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Joined: 2013 Mar 18

sadly this didnt end well i ended up returning the guys hard drive + had to give up on recovering his files; i think the drive was dead