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supernova777's picture
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Joined: 2013 Mar 18
copying old 1.44mb floppy 'key auth' disks

[img]http://macos9lives.com/smforum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=2680.0;attach=2772;image[/img]

someone over on macos9lives.com was asking me how to duplicate/copy his vision 1.4 disks.. as u know opcode is a defunct company.. and the program is long since off the market since gibson bought opcode in 1998 + eventually closed its doors in 1999.

because of this programs pioneering importance with regard to the history of DAW programs
id liek to try to get a copy of it myself..

can anyone offer any technical assistance or insights on whether or not this is possible?

the guy with the disks said that the disk is counting how many times hes installed the disk. but ive heard of people successfully copying these 'master' or 'key' auth disks before..

http://macos9lives.com/smforum/index.php?topic=2680

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Dookie Boot's picture
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Joined: 2015 Jan 11

I'd like to know the answer to this as well. Final Draft 3 for Macintosh has a similar copy protection scheme which requires a key disk and only allows two hard drive installations at a time. You have to use the key disk to "deauthorize" the installations to regain your two permissions.

themacmeister's picture
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Joined: 2009 Oct 26

Same as Cubase too, but I believe it only allowed ONE install, but with constructive use of saveable RAMdisks, you could get around that restriction Smile

supernova777's picture
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Joined: 2013 Mar 18

there must be a way to crack this.. considering its 2015 and this is a copy protection scheme from 20 years ago

SuperMew98's picture
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Joined: 2013 Mar 14

Bump

What ever became of this? I have some old Vision diskettes that are locked because they were installed too many times. They might even be bad, they haven't been used in several years.

Dookie Boot's picture
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Joined: 2015 Jan 11

The key disk/hard drive authorization software used in Final Draft is called Protections Logicielles, written by a company called Aetis which no longer exists. This may be the same copy protection scheme used in other commercial applications mentioned.