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MikeTomTom's picture
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Basilisk II (Windows builds by Lauri Pesonen)

Christian Bauer was the author of Basilisk II that was open sourced, and further developed by Gwenole Beauchesne who was the author of JIT Basilisk II, which is the most commonly used forked port that we see running on Mac, Windows, Linux and Android.

And Lauri Pesonen who was the author of the Windows only, build 142 and is as you say, shelved. It's now very old and probably not widely used. Why is was not developed further I couldn't say. Though I know Lauri Pesonen who created it (and HFVExplorer) went on to doing other things, like having a paying career.

The only issue I've had with build 142 is that Macintosh software updaters that use Vise installers don't seem to get along with it. Other than that I, found it to be faster and more stable than my original Q650 which I used the ROM from, on the Pentium 1 that I first started using it with. And around 1000 times more stable than the JIT forked B2's.

Now, a 1000 times more stable is a slight exaggeration I know, so lets say I find it to be a very stable port, much more-so than the JIT builds and that it rarely crashes, ever.

I still prefer using build 142 over the JIT builds, although I do use both. When I'm using a Mac, I don't have a choice.

Footnote: This topic and it's posted replies (those made from 2020/09/07 and earlier) have been copied over to this page from the SoftWindows topic. I have recreated those posts under it's own title, (a) because this thread took on a life of it's own and (b) the discussion was joined by Lauri Pesonen himself, taking the topic to a new level.

So much so that I thought it deserved it's own page. I hope you enjoy reading it and will contribute to it further. - MTT

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cbone's picture
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Recapping, build 142 only runs in a Windows environment, right?

So is it possible to run this build on a virtualized Windows environment like VirtualBox, VMWare Player and possibly QEMU? I'm not exactly sure as to how QEMU virtualizes things!

I ask because if I can get something like LIMBO to run Windows 95 or higher on my Android environment, I could try that special build on my Chromebook!

MikeTomTom's picture
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Unfortunately, by running build 142 under virtualization, you would be missing out on so much of what build 142 can bring to the table. e.g.;

A static IP address if needed (I do need this) <-- 32 bit Windows required.
Floppy media support (1.4MB only - a hardware limitation, not B2's limitation).
SCSI HFS HD support (to PC's with an available SCSI card).
Read/Write to SCSI removable media (Zip drives, etc)
Keyboard remapping that puts the JIT builds to shame.
CD-R writability - no DVD support, but this build pre-dates wide DVD adoption

Basically, a 680x0 Mac that is as close as you can get to the real thing, under emulation.

Lauri's picture
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Joined: 2020 Sep 4

Mike, you have said so many good things about me and my port -- which I just noticed ... so I just had to create an account and reply! Thank you.

I'm retired now, an old fart Smile Maybe a bit ill also. But who knows, maybe I will activate and find those old sources and play with them a bit Smile MacIntosh was always close to my heart ...

All the best,
Lauri

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Wow... it's been a long time, Lauri! Sorry to hear about the health issues.

If you've got the time/energy, it'd be great if you could do some sort of an interview with Richard Moss. There's so much about that period in Macintosh history that is slowly being lost to time.

Lauri's picture
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Hi, adespoton Smile Heh, were you present at the forums, during the hectic days of the Basilisk II development? I mean the forums that Jim Watters, Al Hartman and others maintained -- maybe you used another nic. 1999 or so, or perhaps even earlier, before Basilisk II -- Executor and Vmac days. Or did we even exchange some emails?

Hmm, I don't know who Richard Moss is -- I have been out of touch of Mac emulation for so long ... other priorities made me drift elsewhere, you know how the life goes Smile But it is true that at my age (59), now is the time to remember, and try to pass any fun and sometimes not-so-funny things to others, without offending anyone and breaking any trust, of course.

For a couple of months, I have been doing this very same thing with my brothers and my sister Smile Haha!

Lauri

adespoton's picture
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Hi Lauri,
Back in 1999 I think I went by a different name; this one didn't settle down until sometime around 2003 when I took over management of emulation.net from John Stiles. That said, we likely exchanged a few emails, but I was purely a lurker on the old forums that Jim Watters and Al Hartman were maintaining.

MikeTomTom has pointed me to your old interview with Marc Hoffman that I had somehow forgotten about. Richard Moss is a UK-based writer who's been active since the early 2000s, and has released a couple of books and many online articles on Ars and elsewhere regarding Macintosh history, specifically gaming and emulation development. He also follows these forums Smile

[edit] After following the rest of this thread, I now remember where we last ran into each other Lauri! Over on Emaculation discussing the signed drivers Smile Before that, it's been years and I can't recall any specifics.

mossy_11's picture
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Australia-based, not UK, but thank you for thinking of me and for pointing me to this thread. Lots of interesting stories here.

I think we're better keeping this as a community thing than having me interview Lauri directly — some of you know way more about the late-90/early-2000s era of emulation on/of the Mac than I do, and the informal discussion is yielding great results so far.

(I'll probably reference/quote some stuff from this thread in an upcoming book project, by the way — after I finish writing Shareware Heroes I'll be self-publishing another Mac gaming history thing, which will include coverage of the old emulation scene.)

adespoton's picture
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Whoops; sorry about that Richard! I used to know you were from Oz, but at some point my memory seems to have migrated you around the world.

Looking forward to the next book, as always Smile

cbone's picture
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Wow! Will your upcoming book, Shareware Heroes, come with a couple of DVDs chock-full of multi-platform emulation goodies? Laughing out loud

I'm just kidding, with just a hint of wishful thinking thrown in for good measure.. I just can't help myself sometimes, lol! Wink

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Alas, no. As delightful as one or more companion DVDs (or probably a USB key, given how few present-day computers have disc drives) of shareware games would be, that'd add a bit much complexity and extra cost to the project.

We actually did discuss doing something like that for Secret History of Mac Gaming, though. In the end the compromise was just to link to a download of an old Apple demo CD that Craig Fryar put together during his games evangelist days. (And when we got to a few days from the print deadline without Craig having archived and uploaded said CD, or written any complementary material about it, I had to instead link to a page here that I think is an archive of the same disc.)

And on the subject of half-jokes that have a touch of wishful thinking to them, I'll freely admit that Plan B for Shareware Heroes — if I couldn't get a publisher — was to put it out as shareware — perhaps under the old Apogee model of shareware (break it into three parts or "episodes", with the first one being free).

cbone's picture
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I hope a publisher bites at the bit, of course, but the idea of a book being shareware does have merit!

I wonder if places like Amazon give allowances for self-publishing? Then your book could be offered in parts/episodes like you say, and the first part could have special days where it'd go for free, you know?

I just know I already have a huge collection of unread free books from them already, lol! Laughing out loud

MikeTomTom's picture
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There's so much about that period in Macintosh history that is slowly being lost to time.

@adespoton: Here's a (Web Archive link) OS Emulation HomePage interview with Lauri Pesonen by Marc Hoffman, author of the Basilisk II (build 142) manual and person responsible for the now defunct OS Emulation HomePage site.

There's probably others out there, but I came across this interview with Lauri this the other week when I was looking up info on Marc Hoffman.

MikeTomTom's picture
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Greetings, Lauri.

I have posted into your guestbook, but I will repeat here too. I was so surprised and am so happy to see a post from you here.

Well, I have used your Basilisk II port for so long now, that I am also an old fart Wink
I do hope though that your illness is not too serious and that you will be enjoying life to the full soon.

If you do locate those old sources and decide to revisit some old ground, of course, having b2ether.sys & cdenable.sys working in 64bit Win OS's as well, would also be on the wish list Wink

I really cannot thank you enough for Basilisk II build 142, nor for HFVExplorer, which is an essential tool for me too. Both of these software's are not replaceable to me. Thank you so much for this gift to us all.

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Mike, thank you very much ... after all these years I just happened to do some random google searches for fun -- like "lauri pesonen basilisk" -- and stumbled on your comments. Made my day, very nice that my hard work back then is still usefull to at least some people! Rewarding. And, btw, I remember quite well how much the bug running QuarkQXpress 4.x bothered me, really! I debugged it, and it was obviously a bug in how the 680x0 status flags were handled in the assembler version. Kind of ironic, don't you think, that at my paying job, I made XTensions to Quark. Haha! This was the one bug I would like to have been fixed.
The stuff with 64 bit drivers would be complicated, mostly because of the way how Microsotf now wants them signed ... I will give it some thought anyway but no promises of course Smile
Lauri

MikeTomTom's picture
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Thank you, Lauri. Tho' I can't say that needing signed drivers would be an issue for me Wink

64bit drivers and Basilisk II aside:

HFVExplorer; When copying files from an HFS container, such as an HFS CD volume, over into a writable HFS volume such as a mounted (in HFVExplorer) .HFV image. If copying a folder of items from the CD into the ,HFV image, HFVExplorer appears to recreate the folders. That is, the folder and any nested folder inside of that folder, is given both created and modified, current date and time stamps. Any chance that this could be changed to preserving original date and time stamps would be very much appreciated. HFVExplorer doesn't touch the date and times of items contained in those folders, only folders are date/time modified.

Anyway, should you ever revisit these codes again... I am sure that the Macintosh Garden will be a great sounding board for anything you can do for this software.

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Well, when I talked to someone a few years back I got the impression that nowadays it is hard to install and use unsigned drivers ... you need to reboot the computer in some insecure test mode, Microsoft has put in some serious roadblocks. But I don't really know for sure, I haven't kept up with these issues so maybe there is some workaround.
It's a good idea to write down at this site this kind of todo-list. Whether I ever do anything about them, is another thing entirely. Haha! Remains to be seen. But it is always remotely possible that someone else does. I have given copies of the sources to many people, for example the Emaculation guys have them.
Lauri

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I was being half serious there, Lauri. At this point in time I can't see myself using a Windows release beyond XP Wink
But yes, signed drivers may very well be a sore point.

I did find a good source of your basilisk II binaries and source at the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine.

It looks as though there may be copies of all of your releases since v0.3

Basilisk II build 142 binaries and source here.
And the rest here: v0.3 to v0.8 build 141

Lauri's picture
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About drivers: yes, I understand that some people could live with unsigned drivers ... but should I release anything for wider audience, the stuff must be easily usable with modern OS'es. Been there, seen that -- otherwise my email or whatever would be flooded. Never again that Smile I still have a copy of my emails from that time, thousands and thousands of messages.

I'm using Windows 7 which was the best in my mind ... for me. Downhill after that. But I cannot connect it to Internet any more, I'm using a Linux box booting from USB stick for that.

About sources: Basilisk sources were always downloadable ... but although HFVExplorer sources were also GPL, they were available "by request" ... GPL rules allowed this. I had reasons to do it this way. About 30(??) people requested the sources back then. Some more later on until my email address changed.

Lauri

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Lauri. You've mirrored your old HFVExplorer and Basilisk II pages.
Thank you for this. I had no idea they were available. They are such a great resource to have at hand.

I stumbled onto them today while I was trying to find an HFVExplorer that someone had put into a Java jar wrapper. I had looked at this earlier in the year but have forgotten where I had found it. Anyway it wasn't a very good HFVExplorer and mostly not functioning, but the concept was good, for the portability side of it.

Anyway, thanks again for keeping the HFVExplorer and Basilisk II pages alive Smile

Lauri's picture
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Actually that is not me ... now that you mentioned it, I think that I have seen those pages before. Someone apparently decided that those pieces of old software are now "abandonware" -- which is kind of true -- and created a copy of my old site. Well done, kudos for them! The guys at www.emaculation.com have also done an amazing job on keeping Mac emulation stuff alive, and Macintoshgarden too, of course. It is so nice to see that people have such enthusiasm for the beloved Mac, just like me years ago.

When I browsed through those pages you mentioned, I had a good laugh: HFVE page: "Read the on-line help. (Warning: this is a single large file, about 100kB + images". So, 100 kB? "a large file"? Haha! Times change ...

Now that I have thought about it: adespoton made a very good point at the beginning of this conversation: I think that I will write down stories about what happened during those days. I had a chance to see many things besides my own contributions. In what form they could be published remains to be seen. Don't hold your breath Smile

MikeTomTom's picture
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Not you? The person has done a very good job at recreating your original pages.

Yes, the warning "Read the on-line help. (Warning: this is a single large file, about 100kB + images)" I recall this from when it was your original page for HFVE. I struggled through and was glad that I did - Well worth the dial-up wait Smile

> Don't hold your breath
I am enjoying the reading very much so far, breathlessly Smile

MikeTomTom's picture
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but although HFVExplorer sources were also GPL, they were available "by request"

Ah I've found that Java HFVExplorer project: catacombae hfvexplorer

Looks like the last GPL3 update was in 2015, so may be abandoned. It certainly feels unfinished.

I was hoping that it would be something I could use on OS X but it's not nearly as useful as the native HFVE 1.3.1 on Windows.

MikeTomTom's picture
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btw, I remember quite well how much the bug running QuarkQXpress 4.x bothered me, really! I debugged it, and it was obviously a bug in how the 680x0 status flags were handled in the assembler version.

You know, I never got to try out QuarkExpress 4.x until about 10 years ago, when a copy was added to the MG's archive.

First thing I did was install it onto Basilisk II build 142 and then only to find that it didn't perform too well at all ! It bothered me quite a lot at the time and I commented elsewhere:

On Lauri's port. it all works, full screen, mills of colours, networked PS printers, Every other 68k prog on the planet works OK on this, except for QXP 4!!!!!!!!! QXP 4 runs, but there is no text when opening saved documents! It doesn't even print the %#^&*!#@% text. Sad

Heck, I must have been disappointed to write such a thing Wink

Installing it onto a B2 JIT build, QXP 4 was fine working without any issue. So the JIT build had something that build 142 couldn't do. Rats.

But after using QXP 4 for a short time, I decided that I much preferred the earlier QXP 3.32 release anyway and continued on with that earlier version happily in B2 build 142 Smile

cat_7's picture
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Hi,

Lauri kindly fixed BasiliskII to read CDs on 64 bit systems in 2015 already. I created a new build back then. See here: https://www.emaculation.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=5282
Cd reading source code is here: https://surfdrive.surf.nl/files/index.php/s/6NDYPtkLYuKSpwn/download

Best,
Cat_7

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Hi Cat_7,

Oh, I did? How bad my memory is nowadays ... at least I remember that we were talking about HFVExplorer sources back then ... I found them and sent them to someone, I think that it was you. You very kindly did some kind of proofreading, deleted my frustrated comments from the source code! Wasn't it so? Haha!

Lauri

cat_7's picture
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Hi Lauri,

Yes, I cleaned the code. Not much frustration found. I cleaned almost nothing Wink

Best,
Cat_7

Newsman's picture
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Still following your great links. But I can't locate the interview by Marc Hoffman

That's your CV!!!!

MikeTomTom's picture
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@Newsman: See this post, above.

cbone's picture
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Excellent point, Mike: I hadn't realized what Lauri's build brings to the table! Laughing out loud

Than perhaps the angle to take it might be to have a dedicated OS on real hardware for the job! This may be a way to 'connect' the Mac emulator to real hardware. Due to its low requirements, something like ReactOS might run on some low-specked PCs; here's a youtube video showing it running on bare metal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwfKM8cFIDI

cbone's picture
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I want to both thank you Lauri for all you've done to keep 68k Macs in the spotlight. Without all you've done, a huge part of the world of those first beautiful Macs would have been lost to time!

I can't wait to hear your life/Mac stories and anecdotes! Laughing out loud In the covid-zoom world we're in now, maybe a zoom-youtube interview special that can later be ported to the cornica.org site would be an amazing honor and treat to everyone here at the Garden, as well as those who love and use Basilisk II daily, like myself and many, many others, and far beyond all of us!

I hope and pray your health improves, Lauri!

One thought that came to me as you talked about Windows compatibility is the possibility of using a virtualizable surrogate OS.. I was thinking about ReactOS, or XP as Mike mentioned. I, like you, absolutely loved the introduction of Windows 7: it was so balanced, uncluttered and it's a shame time has taken this approach to OS simplicity away compared to what we have now in Windows 10. I meantioned ReactOS because I like how it keeps everything very simple and low-specked, and that you can virtualize it to run it on any modern OS, including Linux!

I know, I know, it's Alpha software that's been worked on for the past decade-and-a-half, but it may work for running Basilisk II anywhere you need to, just a thought!

Thanks again for joining the Garden, Lauri! Laughing out loud

Lauri's picture
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Thanks cbone!

Would you guys like the stories written in English or in Finnish? Haha Wink

I know that this is not the place to publish the stories, but perhaps the Macintoshgarden admin does not kick me out of this site if I do a quick test. This kind of stories:

After Christian Bauer implemented Ethernet networking in the Linux version of B2, I wondered what to do with the Windows port. Because ethernet was now available in the Linux version, my email was immediately flooded with questions: why don't I take the new code and recompile it for the Windows version? Am I lazy or what, or on some kind of holiday? If only it would be so easy ... In Windows we needed a kernel mode driver to do the stuff. After some pondering I grabbed the DDK packet driver sample code and studied it ... it was the most buggy and sloppy piece of software I had ever seen released as a "helpful sample" for the developers. And I have seen a lot! There even was one web site dedicated to the bugs in the packet driver sample! It was maintained by Lew Perin. Hey, it seems that it is still on-line in some form Smile Search for "Bugs in the NT DDK Packet Protocol Driver Sample" if you are interested. I also contacted Eliyas Yakub, the guy at Microsoft in a process of rewriting the code, and he kindly sent me a version that was somewhat better, even though it was not yet officially out.

So, I edited the code and made an NDIS protocol driver for B2 to route Mac packets to the net ... strangely enough, I got it working, and it was a big thing! People liked it very much although initially some bugs remained. The forums exploded, and I was very pleased with myself ... for a short while ...

There was a very nice guy, J, closely resembling Mike: very friendly, excited about B2 and always eager to help other forum members. I could tell his name, too, because after telling the following story to me in a private email, he also later on discussed it in public, so I'm not breaking any trust.

J was working for a large Fortune 500 company as a tech support person. He was so excited that he tested the B2 ethernet functionality at work ... he chose a random local IP address ... and BOING!!! It was the address used by the most important server over there. Systems down, even the CEO was wondering what was happening.

Of course, such a large company was security-aware. J was tracked down in no time, and eventually fired. They thought that he was some kind of hacker ...

I was very sad and depressed for a while. It was not my proudest moment that someone got fired over using software written by me ... but after thinking hard, I realized that the same would have happened if he had used a real Mac. So B2 ethernet emulation was clearly working "properly"! Haha! All I could do was to put in some serious warnings on how to use it Smile After twenty-something years this is an amusing story, but it wasn't back then.

Lauri

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cbone wrote:

>> I want to both thank you Lauri for all you've done to keep 68k Macs in the spotlight. Without all you've done, a huge part of the world of those first beautiful Macs would have been lost to time!

Ah -- one more thing, to put the record straight before I forget: although I also contributed to the emulation core quite a bit, Christian Bauer was the guy that you should thank ... he was the genius behind B2, I was only a lowly Windows port author Smile Haha! Christian was finishing his thesis in 1999-2000 in Germany and still had some time to dedicate to B2 development, hats off. Hmm? I haven't talked to him in years, maybe I should drop a line to say hello. Last time I heard about him he was a theoretical physicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A photo from 2011: https://www.energy.gov/articles/10-questions-physicist-christian-bauer

"those first beautiful Macs" -- I could not have said it better myself. Yep.

Lauri

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Now that I remembered  this, it's good to repeat this information here too; my initial correction was too down below.

So, I  was in error, this is not THE Christian Bauer after all! Smile

[Edit] Just for the sake of completeness, for the future generations: he did finish his PhD thesis in theoretical physics in 2005. Smile

Lauri

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Apparently it is ok that I tell stories here. I will continue for a while, at least until someone says "shut up" Smile

The story of "cdenable" is worth telling.

Back then, many developers noticed a very strange and annoying problem: under Windows 95/98 series, it was not possible to read CD sectors at the beginning of the cd, the so-called ISO superblock. Microsoft had put in some limitations to prevent it. I noticed it when I was working with HFVExplorer. I started HFVE as a learning project, I needed to know how to use MFC (Microsoft Foundation Class library) at work, and this was a perfect opportunity for me to study. I will write the story of HFVE later, it is interesting and requires its own page.

However, I could not let that be a roadblock. Hah: when I was younger, my mother said a couple of times that she had never met a person as stubborn as me -- and trust me, that was not a compliment!

Ok. I launched SoftICE -- the kernel debugger I used back then -- and followed the code path downwards. Down we go, down down ... like Alice in Wonderland, down the rabbit-hole ... I noticed how I stepped into ring 0, kernel mode now ... and there it was: a purposely put in denial, no reading of the first 0x10 sectors! Why? I could not understand the reason for this, and it is still a mystery to me. Some Microsoft - Apple commercial warfare?

The only way to circumvent this was to write a vxd. And oh boy, this was a messy business! I had never done this before, and the code samples that Microsoft provided were horrible. I wrote one anyway: it patched the memory image of the cd driver interface on the fly to remove this stupid limitation.

"cdenable.vxd" was not the most stable piece of software ever written. I received many bug reports. Some of them I could fix, some remained mystery. When APM-aware devices started to emerge more, the driver needed some rewriting ... all in all, many times I regretted that I wrote it at all! Because I didn't even use 95/98 series of operating systems normally, I was an early adopter of NT.

But regardless of those headaches, in 1997, something happened that made cdenable worthwhile: I was using Executor, and liked it very much. Because at that time, there was not yet anything better. I wrote a couple of utility programs that linked to Executor. What did they do? I cannot remember. Launchpads, maybe? I uploaded them. And had second thoughts. Is this okay? I wrote an email to Clifford Matthews, the man behind Executor.

He was a friendly man, a scholar, polite, humorous, and had some health issues. He wrote back to me a standard reply, very politely: yep yep yep, do what you want, no conflicts Smile

Then, 3-4 days later, came another email. He had realized that cdenable.vxd existed. Executor had the same problem as everybody, reading the first sectors, and that was essential for a Mac emulator. I gladly gave him permission to use my driver and it was included in many future Executor releases. We talked extensively for some years. I always helped him when I could, he was a very charming person! And oh yes, I remember being so proud when Cliff included my name in the About box credits of Executor! Haha!

I also contributed slightly to the Windows version of vMac. Did it use cdenable too? I think so.

There was a DOS Mac emulator made by Microcode Solutions, "Fusion". Interestingly, after cdenable had done its magic, that is, patching the memory image of the cd driver, Fusion could read Mac cd's too! A nice side-effect. This was needed only when Fusion was used in a DOS-box of Windows; when the computer was booted in pure DOS mode, it had no problems reading cd's.

Writing cdenable version for NT series of OS was no problem, easy-peasy for a professional programmer. There were no such strange roadblocks, by writing a standard .sys driver all CD sectors could be read. I don't remember receiving any bug reports regarding that one. I don't know how things are nowadays, perhaps no driver is needed any more ... at least that would make sense.

And think about how easy stuff like this is under Unix/Linux ... cd's are just block devices. You just read!

Lauri

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Thanks for much for coming here to share some stories. I've been using Basilisk II since the days of those old forums run by Jim Watters and Al Hartman. If you ever want to chat with those guys, the remnants of the communities are over here on Facebook -

https://www.facebook.com/groups/328020689211/

Coincidentally, just yesterday I found myself diving into the wayback machine to find a copy of your 94th build of Basilisk II for an E-Maculation wiki update. Perhaps you'll be happy to know that the software you worked on is still being used. It still has a following.

I'm glad to hear you've been busy in the years since your last Basilisk II release in 2001!

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Thank you very much for the link to meet those guys. I may even create a Facebook account, now it is tempting ... I'm an old-school email guy Smile

Was it so that build 94 was the last time when Classic emulation worked before I somehow broke it and never fixed even though I intended ...

A guy with a nic "Sergio" also ran some forum ... and there was a Topica forum run by "Tim", I think.

Lauri

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Good memory! Yes, that's why we've continued to distribute build 94 for the past 21 years. Classic emulation broke after that. Most people use "Mini vMac" for that now, but there is still an occasional request.

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Mini vMac is really cool, thanks for reminding! I remember that I admired how nicely Paul Pratt implemented it. I have used it for playing those wonderful ICOM Simulation games; Uninvited, Shadowgate, Déja Vu ...

Lauri

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Series of interesting email exchanges, nro 0001:

Haha Smile

Lauri

UNHAPPY "CUSTOMER":

Due to your software, my hard drive has suffered file system damage. I created a volume of 500MB, Using your software. Originally my Hard Drive had 1.3GB free space. While transferring from volume to volume (30MB worth of files from a 40MB volume, to the 500MB volume, your software crashed.. Leaving my hard drive with 7.5MB free space. This is NOT RIGHT!

I want to know
1.) Where has the disk space gone
2.) Why does your software do this
3.) How can I get the disk space back.

If there is permanent damage to my hard drive, I will make sure this potentially lethal software is removed from the internet. Why should 1.3GB be used up to transfer a 30MB file?

SUPPORT GUY LAURI:

>Due to your software, my hard drive has suffered file system damage. I
>created a volume of 500MB, Using your software. Originally my Hard Drive had
>1.3GB free space. While transferring from volume to volume (30MB worth of
>files from a 40MB volume, to the 500MB volume, your software crashed..
>Leaving my hard drive with 7.5MB free space. This is NOT RIGHT!

I'm assuming that you are talking about HFV Explorer.

>I want to know
>1.) Where has the disk space gone
>2.) Why does your software do this
>3.) How can I get the disk space back.

Sounds like you are using the new Windows Millenium Edition which has a silly "System Restore" feature, effectively taking backups of all files, all the time. Including HFV volume files.

>If there is permanent damage to my hard drive,

I don't know any software that could actually damage hardware.

>I will make sure this
>potentially lethal software is removed from the internet.

Huh?

>Why should 1.3GB be
>used up to transfer a 30MB file?

Turn off Windows ME System Restore, or whatever it is called, and delete the garbage backup files.

And DO NOT email me ever again. I have zero tolerance for threats.

"CUSTOMER":
I am very sorry about the previous mail I sent. I was very stressed out
because things like this have happenned before and has actually destroyed my
Motherboard, CPU, Hard Drive and RAM, Luckily my PC was still under warranty.
The hard drive had lost so much space that it had overloaded and literally
made the motherboard burn out.

I didn't mean any of the things I said, I'm known for having a filthy temper.

It seems running the software again has given me 1.3GB, But system restore
has still taken most of my hard drive space. It hasn't made any restore
points before the software was run, So I will complain to micorosft..
unlikely that they will actually help though.

Once again I am very, very sorry.

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Series of interesting email exchanges, nro 0002:

The famous (infamous?) HFVExplorer lawsuit! Who remembers this, rise up your hand!

HFVExplorer has been included in countless CD's, those that ship with magazines. Some of those publishers asked for my permissions -- which was actually unnecessary -- and some didn't.

All was well until in Germany, a company named Symicron sued both Microsoft and the famous c't magazine in court -- why? Because Symicron had trademarked the term "Explorer", but never used it in any of their products! They sued Microsoft because M$ had "Explorer" file manager and "Internet Explorer", c't because they had distributed two programs on their add-on cd's, HFVE and FTP Explorer.

I remember that I was quite irritated ...

All the information available regarding this was in German language which I never mastered. Christian translated it for me, I let him tell you the rest of the story. I'm sure that he doesn't mind, I checked that there is nothing personal included. These emails are dated 2002:

("DM" means Deutsche Mark, the currency they used before Euro in Germany. In Finland, we also used marks -- Finnish Markkas! Haha)

Hi!

On Sun, Sep 22, 2002 at 11:22:45AM +0300, Lauri Pesonen wrote:
> >but some years ago the German magazine c't was sued over the issue
> >by Symicron. They claimed to have exclusive rights
> >to use the name "Explorer" or something to that extent.

According to c't (http://www.heise.de/newsticker/data/hob-30.07.02-001/),
Symicron's "Explorer" trademark has been deleted. The first paragraph reads:

  Today, the German Patent and Trademark Office made a board decision to
  delete the German trademark "Explorer". This trademark was previously owned
  by the company Symicron based in Ratingen. The reason given for the
  deletion in the statement available to heise online reads: "The department
  of trademarks is convinced that the owner of the trademark in question was
  in bad faith at the time of the trademark's registration on September 22,
  1995 [hey, that's precisely 7 years ago :-]. The specific acts of bad faith
  that come into consideration are the matters of obtaining a trademark by
  [fraud/trickery?], of a "blocking trademark", and of an "ambush trademark"
  [I'm not certain what this is supposed to mean; maybe something similar to
  a "submarine patent"?].

However, the last paragraph says:

  Currently, the decision has not yet become final. It can still be appealed
  against at the Federal Patent Court within the period of one month.
  Symicron's lawyer von Gravenreuth already announced that he will recommend
  this step to his client.

Well, this "one month" is over. I don't know what the final decision was,
though.

Bye,
Christian

Hi!

On Mon, Sep 23, 2002 at 02:10:12AM +0300, Lauri Pesonen wrote:
> Sounds like Symicron was on a fishing trip just like the people
> registering domain names with the goal to sell the domain
> to a company which only later on realizes that they have
> an interest to the given name -- maybe that's what an "ambush
> trademark" refers to.

Yes, that's the impression I get. Apparently, they never used "Explorer"
for any real product of their own.

(there's a long explanation at http://www.heise.de/newsticker/data/hob-03.08.02-001/
about this)

> I don't know whether it is true, but someone said that
> Microsoft was forced to pay to Symicron because Windows
> GUI shell was named "Explorer", and later for "Internet
> Explorer" perhaps.

Microsoft made a one-time payment of DM 90000 to Symicron as part of an
out-of-court settlement. Basically, Symicron said "Pay, and we promise
not to cause any trouble in the future." Microsoft paid to avoid lengthy
legal proceedings.

Bye,
Christian

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Very interesting stories about Basilisk + HFVExplorer.

I think I'll request a patent for breathing and you all will pay me then. Wink

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Series of interesting email exchanges, nro 0003:

Back in the fall of 1999, I got an email from a man named Marciano Siniscalchi. He had problems using USB modem with B2 and we discussed it ... he was an assistant professor at Princeton university. Nowadays he is a professor of economics at Northwestern University.

A couple of months later, we talked when I was in the process of rewriting the FPU code, it was very buggy and nearly unusable. I already got many bugs fixed but there was a nasty problem with the FREM instruction that I could not solve. But Marciano could! Emails below.

Btw, Marciano quite carelessly gave me a permission to quote him --- I just contacted him and asked! He probably did not realize that this makes him look very smart! Too late to say "no" anymore! Haha!

I'm very careful when quoting other people's emails.

This was typical back then: I got help from many people, from all around the world, and had many interesting discussions!

Lauri

MARCIANO:
    >I *think* I got it. Here's the idea: the quotient in the calculation is
    >an *integer*. Say you want to determine which quadrant a given angle
    >lies in; for example (using degrees), say your angle is 110 degrees. You
    >can use FREM (pretending it works in degrees for argument's sake) with a
    >modulus (divisor) of 90 degrees: you get a remainder of 20, and a
    >quotient of 1. This tells you that your angle lies in the second
    >quadrant, and indeed 7 bits are more than enough to figure this out (two
    >would be enough).
    >
    >On the Pentium, you only get the 3 lsb's, so you can divide the circle
    >into 8 slices (each pi/4 radians, as per the Intel manual); on the
    >68881, you get the 7 lsb's, so you can get more accurate info---you can
    >split the circle into 128 slices!
    >
    >In your example, your quotient of 1.3333etc. should result in the 7
    >quotient bits being set to 0000001, i.e. 1.
    >
    >Hope this works...
    >
    >M

LAURI, WORKING WITH THE CODE AT THE DEAD OF NIGHT:
    You're a genius! I can't believe it, it is just like
    you say! Now Maelstrom works like a charm! "Starry Night"
    (an amateur stellar program) works also. Marathon works
    better, this bug is fixed but some other remains.

    Was that what all of you had in mind all along, but I was
    blinded by thinking about the floating point mantissa?

    Lauri

    P.S. A humble request, may I credit you in the readme?

MARCIANO:
    I would be very happy if you credited me in the readme, but please don't
    call me a genius!

    I also thought that the quotient was going to be a floating-point
    number; I sort of got the idea when I read in the Intel manual that 3
    bits were sufficient to identify which pi/4-sized portion of the circle
    you were in. The comment in the Moto manual is somewhat confusing.

    BTW, you really work long hours! I got your email at 7:28pm. What time
    was that in Finland?

    M
   

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Some years ago I got an email from Steve Englehart who needed help using either Basilisk II or SheepShaver to get at some old files. He's a comic book writer who created a bunch of the characters in the big Marvel movies nowadays. I had read a bunch of his comics as a kid, so it was cool to hear from him.

I also got an email from science fiction author David Brin, who began his message "Hi... science fiction author David Brin here." Weird, but acceptable, since I read a bunch of his stuff when I was in university.

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One of the very early adopters of Basilisk II Windows port was the kid brother of the guy who used to lead the software and then hardware graphics development team at Apple, and was one of the brains behind QuickDraw 3D. He also designed two of the custom 3D graphics rendering chips that were in the Apple QuickDraw 3D graphics accelerator card. He left Apple before Steve Jobs returned because things looked hopeless at the time. He found the same kind of work at SGI.

Lauri

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Keep it coming, Lauri, please! Wink and before anyone says it, yes, I'm a glutton for Mac lore, lol! Laughing out loud

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Series of interesting email exchanges, nro 0004:

Alan Cox, the Linux developer and at the time "second in command" after Linus Torvalds, advised this early in 1999. It was the vMac-dev mailing list. I thought that it was a bit too much ... but after one rude email, something snapped and I tried it.

It did not work ... the guy sent me a reply with the suggested subject line! Smile

Lauri

WESTON:
> Lately, I've been receiving e-mail from users who are unacceptably rude.

ALAN:
Feel free to borrow/adapt this

---

Thank you for your annoying email message. This is an automatic post to inform you that while help and assistance is sometimes free, if you wish to be rude and arrogant then the commercial support charges apply.

Your email has been added to the block list. If you wish to get another message past it to discuss this you must start the subject line "I GROVEL BEFORE YOU IN ABJECT APOLOGY:"

---

I find it works quite well

Such people aren't worth dealing with, if someone phoned you like that you'd put them phone down on them, ditto with email.

Alan

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Hah! I remember that one Laughing out loud I never ended up using it though; instead I just responded to abusive email with a "thank you for your email. It's going in my 'abusive email' collection which I hope to get published in book form some day." Any future emails just got filtered with no response. Only ever had one guy who just wouldn't stop, he sent me 1-3 emails a day for a year from different MX servers using different fake addresses. He always signed his email the same though, so I just filtered on that and eventually forgot to keep checking my spam folder for the entries.

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Series of interesting email exchanges, nro 0005:

(btw, "nro" was a brain fart; it is a shorthand for "number" in my native language. Since I started it this way, I will continue as well. You can enjoy of this free lesson in foreign languages! Haha)

This story relates to Basilisk II because it was told by a user -- I knew him for many years. I won't do direct quotes this time, but tell the story a bit differently.

I, as a Westerner (well, kind of ... heh), had sometimes trouble understanding the Eastern cultures ... the other day I watched Sofia Coppola's great motion picture "Lost in Translation" with Bill Murray, and it reminded me of this.

And please note, the Japanese guy who told me this, the B2 user, was laughing also ... this is not to put down those great people. I laughed *with* him.

Y, a very nice young man was an enthusiastic B2 user, and I gladly helped to fix some of his problems. Many times I liked to chat about other things as well, or people told me stories spontaneously. Y was presently unemployed, and apparently in Japanese culture, this is a very bad thing: he felt, in his own words, that he was not currently "a member of the society". He had separated from his girlfriend and his beloved dog had just passed away ... playing with B2 offered him great comfort. That was nice!

He told me stories about his engineering career. Previously he was working in a job where his task was to develop PLA chips, PIC microcontroller chips and specialized computer cards. He also designed alarm devices with ultrasonic sensors ... in his own words:

Y:
... most amusing was a molester alarm saying "don't do this" or "you idiot, senile, scum!!!!" since Japanese girls could not say such tough words!

The meaning of this was that the girl or woman had this device in her pocket; when some pervert pinched or grabbed her, she pushed the button and the electronic device spoke instead of her! That was apparently allowed, then.

Amazingly Y continued:

... this product was going to be sold in the USA also ...

What were the company marketing people thinking? I don't know about the USA, but it would not have been a great success in Finland ... Smile If I would pinch a girl on a train or subway over here, she would beat me up in no time ... Smile

Naturally, I immediately replied back to him and asked whether he could sell and send me one of those alarm devices. But sadly, he had none any more after he left the company.

Lauri

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Series of interesting email exchanges, nro 0006:

The "miracle request" Smile -- an email subject line.

I thought about this and decided that Cliff would not mind if I told this story even though I have not asked.

In December 1997, Cliff asked my advice about mapping memory under Windows operating systems.

He was very busy; he needed to fly out of town to get one slight medical operation done, he needed to coordinate things to get Executor version 2.0t out of the door, and was worried that the 3 CD's he had promised to me as a "payment" for my help had not yet been sent. Always a gentleman, that was Cliff!

"You're the Win32 wizard. What do you think?"

Haha! Flattering will get you anywhere!

The problem that was bothering him was this: those old and strange Macs placed important global variables at fixed positions on "page 0", the first 4 kilobytes of memory. The DOS version of Executor had access to this memory area, but under Windows, they had to add some offset, then and add and subtract, and that was an extra slowdown. They needed to modify Syn68k, the excellent synthetic CPU made by Mat Hostetter. I'm not sure whether Mat was still with ARDI at that time, he might have already left. Hmm? I never talked to him.

The ARDI guys were very fluent in Linux -- there you would just "mmap" your memory wherever you liked. But that goddamn Windows! Very often there were such random roadblocks, for various reasons.

Together we pondered different options. We considered virtualizing the low memory by writing an exception handler ... but that would have introduced an unacceptable performance hit. I suggested that creating new selectors might help? No...

We agreed how stupid it was that Microsoft was always placing artifical stumbling blocks in the way. It is so brain-dead that instead of including an extra boolean parameter, they chose the option that if some memory pointer was 0, then different things would happen! That is a sloppy, lazy way to design an operating system.

Cliff was worried that I'm wasting my time and suggested that I stop ... he knew that I had a paying job, too. But did I tell you before about my stubbornness ... I was not yet ready to quit, at least until I knew the reason for the problem.

Of course, I knew that there were corresponding Windows API routines that should do the same thing as "mmap" under Unix/Linux. CreateFileMapping and MapViewOfFileEx. But they did not work in this case, for page zero!

This is the Linux code that we tried to repeat. Simple enough:

  addr = mmap ((caddr_t) PAGE_ZERO_START,
      PAGE_ZERO_SIZE,
      PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE,
      MAP_ANONYMOUS | MAP_FIXED | MAP_PRIVATE, -1, 0);

This is the tester coode I wrote for Windows:

GetSystemInfo( &sysinfo );
      mapping = CreateFileMapping(
      (HANDLE)0xFFFFFFFF, // map to page file
      NULL,
      PAGE_READWRITE,
      0,       sysinfo.dwAllocationGranularity,
      NULL
);
if(mapping) {
      mview = MapViewOfFileEx(
      mapping,
      FILE_MAP_WRITE,
      0,
      0,
      sysinfo.dwAllocationGranularity,
      (LPVOID)0 // our zero page address
      );       // test it now...
      ptr = (char *)mview;
      ch1 = *ptr;
      *ptr = 17;
      UnmapViewOfFile( mview );
      CloseHandle(mapping);
}

But no go. So, debugger breakpoints  at appropriate locations and I grabbed my trusty old SoftICE kernel debugger and studied the code to see why this did not work. Just like with cdenable some time earlier.

It turned out that under Windows NT, the reason for the inability to read page 0 was a design flaw I talked about earlier in this story. My email:

EMAIL FROM LAURI:

This code does not work at all under Windows 95, for the reasons we discussed earlier: the low memory area is shared, and when I step into the system code I can see that any reference below 0x40000 is illegal. Trying to force it to work hangs the system.

Under NT, things are different. There is no low memory shared area at all, but it *still* does not work, but for a different reason. Some genius from Redmond has specified that if the last parameter of "MapViewOfFileEx" is NULL, the function behaves differently. That is, the system is asked to give us any linear address. It never occurred to him/her that somebody could want to map to address 0. And, we cannot trick it and specify an address like 1 or 4, since function will fail again - improper alignment.

When I step inside the system code down to the path ,,,
MapViewOfFileEx
      _NtMapViewOfSection
            _MmMapViewOfSection (Ring 0 now)
                  _MiMapViewOfDataSection

... and manually bypass the NULL check, the function returns 0 as it should, and behold - we have the zero page we wanted. We can read from it and write to it.

Conclusion:
- for NT, you *could* have the zero page - with some trickery.
- for 95, you could not.

... and there is no sense in having separate code for 95 and NT.

Well, at least it was interesting.

END OF EMAIL

At first, he was excited that there was some kind progress. But after some more emails and more thinking, it was obvious that Executor needed to live with the extra code to add/subtract offsets. After all, it was no big problem, the program was fast enough anyway. Perhaps someone else could have solved this problem, but I could not Smile Obviously, I was not up to the task to do miracles! Haha

Lauri

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Have you heard from Cliff in recent years? Last I heard he had sold a company (making iPhone apps) to E-Line Ventures. He hasn't had much of an online presence since then.