This page is a wiki. Please login or create an account to begin editing.


8 posts / 0 new
Last post
Vitoarc's picture
Offline
Joined: 2010 Aug 15
Are special install instructions needed with the upload?

I estimate that 98% of the games and applications downloaded from Macintosh Garden are trouble-free, easy to install programs without any installation/launching difficulties. However, those remaining 2% can create some serious challenges when it comes to getting the program to install/run.

By "special instructions" I mean a simple clarification. This applies when a game or application doesn't follow the standard routine of clicking on an installer and having the rest be done automatically.

A short sentence or two in the description field to clarify would be extremely helpful.

Here are some examples to consider mentioning:

- Does the game/application need to be burned to CD and then played from the CD after install?
- Is the installer very picky about where the application/game is installed, and if not placed in the default location you'll have problems launching the program?
- Is the only way to install, and then get the program to run is to copy it to another volume, such as a second hard drive, Zip Disk, or even a flash drive?

There's a lot of people here with varying degrees of expertise, and when uploading please consider that some extra, short tips on how to get the program running will go a long way with many people. It would be great to reduce the need of someone having to ask "how do I get this to run?". After all, it's usually a very easy solution; easy if you know how that is. Wink

Comments

MikeTomTom's picture
Offline
Joined: 2009 Dec 7

Good examples, Vito. I try to do the right thing, give a few hints or tips in case there is someone who knows very little about a software but wants to get up to speed quickly. Sometimes I slip up and forget tho'. I think your topic's post should be made "sticky".

inuya5ha's picture
Offline
Joined: 2018 Jul 16

As a new Macbook user, and even newer MacOS user, I'm having a hard time installing some apps from this site on MacOS 9 because many users upload them with a double compression system. As I already suggested in a new topic, users should be encouraged to upload files using only one compression method, and that format MUST be compatible with MacOS from that era. For example, I believe SIT is the default compression method on MacOS 9, so don't even allow uploads fro MacOS Classic in any other format. QuickTime 6 was uploaded as a CDR for example.

WhosIt.There's picture
Offline
Joined: 2014 Aug 23

.SIT is a file compression format.
.CDR is a disk image format (which may or may not include compression).

They are two very different things for different uses.

The compression is used to make it quicker to upload / download, and in the case of actual applications (rather than disk images) stop the files from being corrupted - "Classic" Mac applications have two 'forks' within the same file: a Data Fork and a Resource Fork. Putting those directly onto non-MacOS systems cause the two to become combined into an single unusable mess.

.SIT is widely used on later "Classic" Macs, but is no means the only option nor is it the "default" (although some version of the Mac OS did install StuffIt Expander). .ZIP is also widely used, and in earlier systems .CPT was the most used. There are many others, but StuffIt Expander can handle most of the common ones anyway. Some compression systems, such as .SEA, are actually self-extracting archives, which means they are applications themselves, so they need to be compressed a second time as normal archive files, to save them being corrupted (these applications were originally distributed as self-extracting archives, so that's why they are left as such when uploaded here).

Your account's "joined" date is today, so instantly jumping in to post three (at least) "complaints" isn't really a very useful or friendly way to start off. As a new user to everything Mac, you're best to read the rules and instructions already posted, and ask polite questions if there is something you don't understand.

SkyCapt's picture
Offline
Joined: 2017 Jan 11

All Mac OS (HFS...) files can be forked, not only the application files. There isn't a good analogy to file forks among traditional architecture. I think the best explanation is to say that every Mac OS "file" is actually two files using the same name, one of these files you are meant to see and use (this is the "data" fork) while the second file has hidden-like status (this being the "resource" fork).

For those new to Mac OS files, something must be done to store Mac OS files on non-Mac systems including networks, done to preserve the Mac fork structures. Most archival/compression utilities perform this feature of outputting a single fork network compatible file, though I'm surprised the ".img" NDIF format does not. If the software you're trying to get is in OS9's ".img" format it will have to be stuffed into a ".img.sit" confusing isn't it.

WhosIt.There's picture
Offline
Joined: 2014 Aug 23

Normal 'document' files, including disk images, do not have Resource Forks. It's mainly applications that have the two forks. The exception is an actual Resource file (e.g. ResEdit document, external resource file sometimes used by games).

SkyCapt's picture
Offline
Joined: 2017 Jan 11

All kinds of files are loaded with resources. The forks were phased out of OS X and no longer are dependent in the latest Hi Sierra, but Tiger my OS X has resource forks everywhere, and ditto OS9 of course.

*.img NDIF files created by Disk Copy 6.3.3 in OS9 show a large resource fork which describes in code how to use the image. The images can't be opened if the fork is dropped, I've tried it uploading one here which does drop the fork and i've watched other people try uploaded their own .imgs unstuffed then get complaints it can't open. For OS9, .img files must preserve their resource fork, typically with ".img.sit" stuff-ed.

Documents have resource forks. The most basic document imaginable, a "plain text" file made using "bare bones text editor" (bbedit) v6.1.2 creates a resource fork to describe the font(s) and window size/placement. Attach a custom icon to ANY file -> resource fork. Use File Info to assign an "Open With" onto any document file -> more resource fork.

In the app "Game Doctor", the files named "Prescriptions" are database documents which are 100% resource fork, they lack any data fork. It was Game Doctor's preferred method of programming design.

WhosIt.There's picture
Offline
Joined: 2014 Aug 23

Facepalm Yes, there are numerous exceptions ... I was trying to keep it simple for a self-proclaimed Mac newbie.