This page is a wiki. Please login or create an account to begin editing.


MacZip 1.06

Rating:
Your rating: None Average: 4.2 (10 votes)
Category:
Year released:
Author:
Publisher:
Download MacZip106c.hqx (381.07 KB)
For System 7.0 - 7.6 - Mac OS 9
Emulation
This app works with: SheepShaver, Basilisk II,

MacZip is a cross-platform compatible tool and includes both Zip (for compression) and Unzip (for extraction). The full set of Macintosh info is stored: Creator/Type, Finder attributes, Finder comments, MacOS 8.0 Folder settings, Icon/Folder-Positions ... Mac filenames are restored without any change. MacZip also supports Apple events, e.g; add it to your web browser's preferences as a helper application.

Freeware.

Other versions and resources of MacZip (including source code) are still available from the MacZip authors page here (last checked: July 2014).

How to use this zip utility:
For simple ease of use, avoid the MacZip "UI" as it is not overly "user friendly".
Instead; For easy access, make an alias of MacZip and keep the alias on your desktop. This makes it very quick and easy to use the Drag and Drop method of compressing and decompressing files.

Compatibility
Architecture: 68k PPC

This is a FAT binary application suitable for both 68k & PPC Macintosh, including Basilisk II & SheepShaver. Requires a Macintosh SSW 7.0 to 9.2.2 and also runs very well under "Classic" on PPC Mac OS X
Not suitable for 68000 CPU Compact Macs or Mini vMac as it requires a 68020 CPU or newer.

Note: If you zip a file containing data in a Macintosh resource fork, MacZip will preserve it in a similar fashion to how Mac OS X does, it uses a proprietary method of preserving the resource fork of these files. This is great for zipping and unzipping classic Mac apps etc - and as long as you use MacZip at both ends it works well.

So be aware of this if zipping up a classic Mac file using MacZip. If a MacZip archive contains data in a Macintosh Resource fork (e.g. most classic applications), then MacZip must be used at the receiving end to safely unzip, to restore that valuable data correctly. If not, then it may end in a ruined file.

It is generally safe to zip files where the resource fork is not important to preserve, such as .jpg, .pct, .tiff, .txt, .sit, etc. but if the zipped file contains critical data in a resource fork, then the recipient must also use MacZip to extract successfully.

Comments

MikeTomTom's picture
by MikeTomTom - 2013, June 2 - 2:58am

... I got it working. I had to manually create an archive folder first before it would zip. Ancient software. LOL.

Vitoarc you were an idiot at times and I still miss ya Smile

Vitoarc's picture
by Vitoarc - 2010, August 27 - 11:20pm

Try dragging a file onto the icon of the MacZip app (or an alias to it) and letting the mouse go. What happens then? Do you see a file named "same-as-dragged-filename.zip" in the same directory as the file you dragged onto it?.

Drag and drop doesn't work, either before launching or after launching MacZip. I tried both the alias and actual drop to the app.

I've got all extensions on. I'm thinking that if scriping isn't on the program won't work.

I also tried the menu action for compress. That doesn't work either. Here is the error message:

Getting file information ...
... done

zip error: Nothing to do! (MacOS753:Desktop Folder:MacZip test file.zip)

Error occurred rc = 12
time: 0 sec

Location of the current "MacZip.Env" file:
[MacOS753:Utility:MacZip 1.06 crypt final:MacZip.Env]

List of all environment variables

End

It looks as though MacZip is reading the plain text file ("MacZip test file") and thinks it's already compressed. Hence the error message "Nothing to do!"

I also tried zipping a folder. Same message. MacZip thinks the folder already has the extension .zip

[EDIT] I got it working. I had to manually create an archive folder first before it would zip. Ancient software. LOL.

MikeTomTom's picture
by MikeTomTom - 2010, August 27 - 8:30am

I can't get this app to zip even a simple text file using 7.5.3 in Basilisk. For me it's been useless. Has anyone else gotten this to work with Basilisk?

Try dragging a file onto the icon of the MacZip app (or an alias to it) and letting the mouse go. What happens then? Do you see a file named "same-as-dragged-filename.zip" in the same directory as the file you dragged onto it?

How about in reverse? Drag a .zip archive onto the MacZip icon and let the mouse go. What happens next? Do you end up with a folder in the same directory as the .zip file that you dragged onto the MacZip icon named "same-as-dragged-zip-filename.Zio"?

Vitoarc's picture
by Vitoarc - 2010, August 27 - 2:27am

I can't get this app to zip even a simple text file using 7.5.3 in Basilisk. For me it's been useless. Has anyone else gotten this to work with Basilisk?

by xy - 2010, March 19 - 10:02am

Besides MacZip, ZipIt and Stuffit there is also an almost forgotten utility called Zipper:
http://www.aarongiles.com/macsoft/index.html
Has anybody experiences with this?

Euryale's picture
by Euryale - 2009, September 2 - 12:07am

All right, got it,
Thank you! Smile

MacWise's picture
by MacWise - 2009, September 1 - 11:58pm

I use a lot PhotoShop (JPG, Gif), HTML, PDF, TEXT files that I create within Mac and need to transfer and use them in Windows and I need them to open (in Windows XP) without any glitches [...]Will MacZip help me?

Yes.

JPGs and GIFs only use the resource fork to store custom icons and the Mac preview, but neither Windows nor any web browser use them.

HTML and PDF files don't use the resource fork at all.

TEXT files depend on it only if they are styled (they include things like italics and pictures) but I'm guessing you use HTML for that, so you are safe.

Euryale's picture
by Euryale - 2009, September 1 - 11:13pm

I use and prefer Stuffit for actual Executable Mac Software opened within Mac OS Classic
so I won't change Stuffit cuz works great. - -

but I use a lot PhotoShop (JPG, Gif), HTML, PDF, TEXT files that I create within Mac and need to transfer and use them in Windows and I need them to open (in Windows XP) without any glitches,

for this I use Stuffit 10 for Windows..

now, Will MacZip help me? (because sometimes I need to transfer those files to other PC's that don't have Stuffit for Windows,
(of course Iam gonna try it but I'd like to hear your opinions and knowledge).

thanks again!

MacWise's picture
by MacWise - 2009, September 1 - 10:49pm
5

A make zip packages with MS Excel files inside at PC Windows and transmit it to Mac classic.
Use to unpack MacZip and is OK. Mac OS 9 see it like Excel files with Excel icons...
Resource forks not lost?

Resource forks don't exist on Windows, only in Classic Mac OS. And while icons are stored on the resource fork, it's the application and not the file what determines file icons. That's why why don't see a difference.

What are we talking about exactly? Personal use or site's archives?

Both. And to make sure nobody gets the wrong idea, I'll say it again: Don't upload zips to MacGarden.

Euryale's picture
by Euryale - 2009, September 1 - 10:43pm

It's always good to have more options, I like that,
but I think we are so used to Stuffit that is hard to change,
also Stuffit works great and it's a referent to the Macs.

still, I 'll check this one out, and find out what it does.

Attila's picture
by Attila - 2009, September 1 - 10:42pm

I've got one use for MacZip on my systems. I use it to zip game roms for MAME and such. Same with gZip. Using it with anything else is just asking for trouble. So much simpler to just use StuffIt and not worry.

Attila's picture
by Attila - 2009, September 1 - 10:31pm

What are we talking about exactly? Personal use or site's archives? I don't want people uploading zips because of what they take away from reading these posts. It will render everything useless for me.

TataMisia's picture
by TataMisia - 2009, September 1 - 10:31pm

"Zip destroys resource forks."

I heard about it very often.
Hmmm...
A make zip packages with MS Excel files inside at PC Windows and transmit it to Mac classic.
Use to unpack MacZip and is OK. Mac OS 9 see it like Excel files with Excel icons...
Resource forks not lost?

MacWise's picture
by MacWise - 2009, September 1 - 10:38pm

@Euryale: If you plan to use the file on Windows, use zip. If you plan to use it on Classic or Mac OS X use sit. Don't worry about the compressed file because both zips and sits can be stored anywhere. The trouble arises when you decompress the Mac file, again because of the resource fork issue, so as a rule of thumb always open sit files on a Mac environment, real or emulated.

@Attila: Let me quote myself:

Keep in mind that if you zip a file with resource fork, MacZip will preserve it the same way Mac OS X does, but you have to open it with MacZip or else the resource fork will show up as an useless file on a separate folder.

True, StuffIt is available for Windows too, but unless you know the target machine has it installed, sending a sit to a Windows user is just mean.

Attila's picture
by Attila - 2009, September 1 - 10:08pm

Zip destroys resource forks. And StuffIt is also available on OSX and Windows. That's all there is to know, really.

Euryale's picture
by Euryale - 2009, September 1 - 9:57pm

Thanks for the explanation , but I have these doubts...

" For Mac-to-Windows transfer is better to zip than to sit,

Are you referring from Mac OS X? or Mac OS Classics (7-9) to Windows is better?

I understand Mac OS X... and Windows XP-Vista have no problems interchanging files
so I can pretty much choose any Compression format of my taste,

but for older programs that run only in Mac Classic OS's and have to download/transfer from modern Win-World systems or share them like we do here at MacGarden,
are there any advantages, or is it just another option from Stuffit,

MacWise's picture
by MacWise - 2009, September 1 - 8:56pm

I didn't understand anything what you guys said, (too technichal)

AppleDouble: File format developed by Apple to store Mac files on Unix Systems. Is not widely supported yet DropZip and ZipIt use it. Even worse Mac OS X zip files use it too.

PKZIP: The original zip application for DOS and now the name of the file format. Zip files compressed this way are compatible with a wide arrange of platforms and applications.

Resource fork: Before Mac OS X files stored their data on two separate parts called forks. When moving files to Windows or Unix only the data fork is copied and depending on the file that might or might not be important. If a Disk Copy image loses the resource fork it becomes useless. If a JPEG loses it only the preview is lost but the rest of the data is safe.

i still don't know the simple advantages or disadvantages over Stuffit.

For Mac-to-Mac transfers there is no advantage. For Mac-to-Windows transfer is better to zip than to sit, although since Mac OS X has built-in zipping abilities more and more people are zipping rather than stuffing, which has created the phenomena of "Mac-only zip files" because Windows built-in zip decompresser can't open them (no AppleDouble support). WinZip opens them, though.

TataMisia's picture
by TataMisia - 2009, September 1 - 6:55pm

Better like Stuffit. But only to zip packages.

Attila's picture
by Attila - 2009, September 1 - 6:52pm

Yeah, for the world of macs the only thing I've ever used Zip for is for emulator roms.

Euryale's picture
by Euryale - 2009, September 1 - 6:18pm

I didn't understand anything what you guys said, (too technichal)
i still don't know the simple advantages or disadvantages over Stuffit.

TataMisia's picture
by TataMisia - 2009, September 1 - 2:15pm

MacZip based at Info-ZIP.
Info-ZIP devlopers say about 99,99% compatibility with PKZIP standard.
This is good news for users another type computers.

If you have zip archive with filenames (for example) in ISO8859-2 code or other national codes, only MacZip can unpack it.
Stuffit Expander and ZipIt surrend.

MacWise's picture
by MacWise - 2009, September 1 - 1:09pm
5

Oh yeah, this baby delivers. Unlike DropZip and ZipIt, which compress using AppleDouble, MacZip use the industry-standard PKZIP format and that makes it truly cross-platform. It also open Mac OS X zip files, something StuffIt Expander 5.5 can't do, and best of all, it's always been free. Being a port of a command-line application means the user interface is unfriendly, but it supports drag-and-drop for those who don't want to deal with such things.

Keep in mind that if you zip a file with resource fork, MacZip will preserve it the same way Mac OS X does, but you have to open it with MacZip or else the resource fork will show up as an useless file on a separate folder. In case of a SimpleText file or an application, that's fatal.

Homepage:

http://www.haase-online.de/dirk/maczip/